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The Parrsitivity Podcast
The Parrsitivity Podcast

Episode 91 · 2 years ago

The Parrsitivity Podcast #episode 11 with Justin Nguyen

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Justin is a speaker, host of the getchogrindup Podcast, aswell as being a LinkedIn consultant. He has a vast amount of in Depth knowledge on marketing, social media, algorithms and the internet today!. In the podcast we talked about society, social media, marketing, internet, consulting on social media, the power of LinkedIn, books, mentors/rolemodels, motivation!. Check out Justin on Instagram @getchogrindup but most importantly enjoy!. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/the-parrsitivity-podcast/message

It all. Look, can you hear me? Yeah, I can you. Can you hear me? Just? Yes, oh sweet no, I really appreciate you've been on the podcast and really good to me. Of course, great to me you as well. Thank you, but but yeah, really means a lot, I think how we can connect on Linkedin. It's quite an amazing platform, isn't it? I you can kind of connect with people. Definitely it's my favorite platform right now because, yeah, I think I've been to just kind of start using it like recently and it's kind of open up a lot of connections and half people are met on the podcast based a lot through that. But but I really appreciate it. Oh, yeah, of course. But Um, well, well, was just thinking is so kind of about what you do. What was it thought you the like can your work and thanks today. Yeah, so my day today, a lot of it right now is linkedin consulting. So over the past year and a half, two years or so, I've built up a large following on linkedin. I'm getting about two hundred thousand views on my content every single month and what I what I've been doing is just reaching out, like companies have started to reach out to me and ask me to help them build out their profiles or content strategy etc. So that's what I do for the majority of the day. But my side, my side Hustle and what I've been growing for the past two years as well, is this company called get your grind up, and the whole purpose of get your grind up is to really help students transition into the real world. So we create a lot of content online. We've got to PODCASTS, one that's in sort of a rebranding stage right now called to get your grind up podcast, and then our second one, which we just lost, which is called declassified college, and declassify college is really really short, five to ten minute episodes. For the most part. We do bring on the occasional industry expert to to talk about certain things such as like scholarships, student journeys, etc. But the majority of our episodes are that five the ten minute range. Oh Wow, that's amazing. So I'll suppose you caught a pretty busy one with like businesses and people kind of kind of Rantin usual consum yeah, it's a it's a daytoday thing, man. It changes every day, but the consistent stuff for the most part is wake up from find ways to promote the podcast, find ways to find more clients and then finding creating content for either myself or my clients. But I took a look at it on or your podcast and some of the things you've gone on Linkedin and you know, it's pretty, pretty amazing what you were going up to. Thank it. I kind of what kind of got you into all of this? What was like the Calisa speak? Yeah, so get your grind up really started off as a joke. I'm of Asian descent and the Asian stereotype is that we're just naturally smart at school, and it's not necessarily a bad thing. But what I wanted to show to all my friends that were like joke around with me is that I was actually working hard to get these a's and getting these internships while I was in college. So would post on my snapchat, my instagram story of Hey, like I'm I'm...

...studying at midnight, or these are my study tips, or this is how I just got this internship, and at the end I would say get your grind up, and it started to build momentum. So one of my best friends are back home, Gary my girlfriend Michelle, were like hey, let's get together and like this turn us into something legitimate. So that's when we started the PODCAST, started creating a lot of content, and that's what led me to linked in and I found out how easy it was to gain traction on linkedin compared to and instagram or twitter or anything like that. So I started to focus my energy on that and that everything's just kind of stemmed from there. I've consulted with companies, I've gone around speaking about linkedin and really looking forward to seeing what the futures like, because I would have never imagine this is what my life would have looked like post graduation. Yeah, I mean it's pretty amazing things can take off, isn't it? I think if you really really believe in something, working and working, then you just take the action and just put into work. You know it's kind of coming. Yeah, I mean that's essentially the mission, like the meeting behind the brand. Get your grind up, is we're always told, girl we got that we could do whatever we wanted to in life, but I believe that that's pretty much true. But they seldomly tell you the covey out of that, which is if you really want to do something that you love every single day of your life, you're gonna have to work extremely hard to get there, and they don't tell you that as a kid, but as you start to grow up you begin to realize that that's the reality and that's what we just want to showcase two students around the world at an earlier age so that they can manage their expectations or they can really understand what it takes to be that influencer, to be that fortune five hundred exact, rather than just saying, Oh, I wanted you that one day and never having a plan of how to reach it. Hmm, it's nice, exactly, and I think it is trying to lie be different and not follow suit of kind of what the rest of society doing. You know, like with what you're doing, you know you're saying that you know it's possible to do that, it's possible to create something and build your own business, because I think about a lot of people were basically like, you know, the good school, go college and then they go to university to get a job and for some people that, you know, it can be hard to get out or to think you know different way buffing, you know what you're doing is pretty inspiring and it's you know, it's pretty out there. Thank you, man. It's a it's been an interesting journey. The Higher Ed space is is a tough space to break into, but we're doing our best here to make grounds into it every single day. HMM. Would you say, like what's happening now? It's quit a moment in time as any challenges that you face with what's happening now, like kind of you know, current situation, or would you say you know, you're you're okay, because it's a lot online and open talking about like coronavirus and everything like that? Yeah, yeah, yeah, so, I mean the corona craziness that's going on right now. It doesn't necessarily affect me too much in terms of income or anything like that. Most of the companies that I'm working with our usually tech startups, so they've been able to move the majority of their work online and their clients aren't necessarily affected by it too much either. So what I'm looking at this is that is a unique opportunity for me because since everyone is moving online, more people are paying attention to Linkedin as well as their emails. So I'm sending out a bunch of emails to promote PODCAST, to try to hop on calls with people, to to do all these sort of things that I might not have been able to do two or three months ago because people weren't monitoring their online profiles as much.

So it's an interesting space for me right now because higher ed I think it's going to be really disrupted after these next six to twelve months because they realize that they're not actually ready for online learning. But we'll see, we'll see what the future has for yeah, see what pulls up. What would you who say will kind of role models are, while I mentors struggle, any kind of people look up to? I mean the people that I look up to a definitely my parents. Both my parents are viewed these refugees and I wouldn't be here without them today. They found ways to get over here to the US without any maps or any google maps or anything like that from back in the day. Came here with no money, nothing to their name, and found a way to create an amazing life for both myself and my brother. It's they're probably my biggest role models, but in terms of like the Business World, Gary V is definitely someone that I pay attention to on a regular basis. Yeah, I'm starting to follow more and more people on twitter, like Matt Kobatch, I think that's his name. He's a great person when it comes to marketing. But I mean, nowadays everyone put so much content online that mentors in terms of like big time mentors. You can just follow their content online and there's just geared towards whatever you need to and they essentially become your mentor, and I think that's something that people forget. Like you can have Gary V as your mentor just by paying attention to his vlog every single week. But people are like, oh, but I can't get any more any mentors or anything that you can. He says all of this stuff out right then and there. You just have to find a way to apply it to your life. Yeah, it's taken what they what they say, isn't it? I'm applying it to the things that you do and how you think and go about fins. Yeah, the informations out there, it's all about the execution. Now I don't think that's so often. That's what I'll people do. A lot of people kind of some people, they kind of find these mentors, they watch that content and they don't take action, and it's like chows and hours. If what somebody says, but if you're not applying what they say to your life or what you're doing, then this is gonna Happen. Yeah, I mean like people. I feel like people think that, especially students, because this is essentially what they're told other college is once you find a mentor, your life kind of falls into place, and that's not necessarily how it works. I think of mentors as they have the ability to throw gas onto a fire. Like you need to have some momentum going and then a mentor will help you accelerate that. A mentor very rarely get you from zero to twenty percent. You need to do that to yourself and then the mentor can help you accelerate to fifty percent and then that next mentor will help you accelerate another twenty percent and then another twenty and another twenty, and that's how mentors work. They don't that first couple steps you need someone. You need to do that yourself and then you can find other people to sort of optimize your your growth after that. Yeah, yeah, sure, exactly, because I think it's it's import as well. It's a have a lot more than one mentor isn't a thing, you know, to all many mentalism to kind of model how you know people do things. But I think is you kind of grow up, you kind of you find different mentors, like I saw just watching Tony Robance, you know, unciney Robbins. It was one of my mentors and I kind of got into like this kind of food and as I've kind of matured, I've kind of like, you know, slept to different mentals, like I rev Simon Senet,...

...not some old people. It keeps it kind of vary, doesn't it? You can kind of see different points of view and aspects respective some different people. Yeah, definitely. I mean I feel like mentors they come and go, right, just like how friends do. Some will stay with you for for the rest of your life, but other people will come in, they help you do something or and you help them do something, and then you just kind of lose lose path. Same with any friends, right. We're not all friends with the same people that we were with in grade school, but there are still like few that you're still friends with today. And I view mentorship the same exact way, whether I'm mentory someone or someone's helping mentory me. I try to help each other out as much as we possibly can, but there is all. There is usually a point where you can't help each other out anymore and you can still be friends, but in terms of that mentorship relationship, it doesn't necessarily have to last for a lifetime, and I don't think people understand that. Yeah, of course, it's about like giving out. You know, what you give out as what you get back, isn't it? You know, not something that we need to waught follow. Is there any topics that you die you'd want to talk about, a tool or any anything you'd like to bring on? Because one, I mean I'm pretty much an open book. Really. My main thing right now is likedd and I think it's it's a beautiful platform, whether your student or whether you're a business owner, because of the majority of professionals are on there. Right it's not like an instagram where you wear your content could be viewed by a five year old and you never does. You don't even know it, but like did you know pretty much that your audience is mainly professionals out there in the corporate world and for any Bab business that's incredibly important and for people who are like me, who who are looking to get connected with with entrepreur or entrepreneurs around the the world. Really it's a great platform because there's no barrier right. There's no executive assistant that's handling someone's liked it. For the most part it's that person handling their own linkedd. So that's I think that's the huge differentiating point and not a lot of people are talking about that right now. I'll think a lot of people don't really know what it is. Spoken to a lot the people in the don't look to me is what they never used by downloaded. Yeah, I mean Lin did this kind of going through a transition phase over the past kind of like I think two years or so after they got bought by Microsoft. Before being bought, they were mainly a resume platform, right, it was. I mean it was pitched as a networking site, but no one really use it as a networking site. It was more used for hopefully to find your next job. But what is transition to? More every since Microsoft has bought it is into more of a social platform and it'll be interesting to see where it goes again in the future. The only tide will tell, and it definitely has the momentum behind it right now. The only thing that I fear is that it gets in a dated with salespeople and sales content and no one really succeeds. What that happens? You're see that already happened with with instagram and how saturated that markets guide, especially with marketers, and it's a little bit of a shade. That's what ends up happy with a lot of these social platforms. But I that's what I fear for late did, but for right now it's a perfect platform for anyone who's just getting started. Yeah, I've noticed not with instagram. Luck I'll off call my instagram feed. I'll scroll through and open like sign up to the sign up to this by this and then I'll get my ultimate to the counts trying to message me and Bitcoin for this, which all poses like fake profiles, and I just got pounded. We you know kind of...

Bitcoin, bitcoin and all these kind of trading profiles, which all really real, where it's six fingers crossed Linkedin doesn't kind of go with on that root. Yeah, it'll be. I think what the ones that linked it has going for them is that it's connected usually to someone's professional, professional career, so to say. It's so you there's no like. It's really hard to. I mean you could fake a profile on Lin did, but it's not as easy as as an Instagram, right, because instagram you can just create a profile and it is better hiding behind a user name, whereas for the majority of people only did, they're hiding behind their real name. Yes, you could create a fake company. Ye, wow, what company profiles are incredibly hard to grow up linked it right now. They're our the really favors personal profiles. Yeah, sir, but I think we've fly Linkedon as well. Like a lot of people, I find people reply to you, they respond to you and engage with you more like you know, I engage, review and ask you, you know, trying to do the podcast and you responding off on that dies most more fluid on Linkedin. It's more real. Where I was, I think on sometimes instagram, some resup platform. You could send somebody a comment and it might not get a replied to, or I might not. Do you know it's me, you know, really get that same response. I feel totally because I feel that I feel well. I feel like that culture. Probably it's the culture of the platform. Right. It's the I am booked for the whole social media thing blew up. It was never really a platform to create a community. It was a place to share a photo right whereas Latekedin, when the social media side of it began to blow up, it was all about community and people understood, because of the maturity of social media in general, that the more that you commented on a post, the more viewage it would get. So everyone at the beginning of linked who wanted to get a bigger audience, they would always cop it back, whether it was truly to create a community or if it was just to add another comment to their post and boosted of Algorithm. So I think people got smarter as linked it began to grow and they understood more of how the Algorithm worked and that's what bread the sort of atmosphere always site, kind of commenting back and messaging back to people on Linkedin, whereas on instagram most people don't understand the algorithm there. It's a lot more complicated, so they don't necessarily engage as much. Yeah, so it maybe it's pretty fascimating, like when you think about it, when you want to look into it, because these algorithms and the more kind of deep well hoping to win the more deep going to these ops, how we actually work. It's quite complete stuff, isn't it? Like? WHO JUST USE IT? Those pictures, bigors, person pictures to the ut she know, but if the apoots proper to use them, because I showed, I showed some people have to do the stories, how to Addoptionings to the story, how to share it, create instagram, TV, and a lot of people are showed that who knew nothing about it. Because, you know, there's a lot more to these platforms than what people say on the surface off. Oh yeah, one hundred percent. I mean to the average person. I feel I feel like I have more social media knowledge than most people, but it's it's it's crazy to see how many people actually don't understand social media the way that they should, especially small business owners, right and that's that's why you're see a lot of...

...this. A lot of people, especially the younger generation, they tout themselves as social media experts and they're able to charge these high amounts of fees to these businesses because these some of these business they don't know anything better. So for anyone out there who's listening that might run a small business like you, should always look out and see who the person that you're working with actually is like, see if their engagement is real, if their profiles real, everything like that, because the bad like I don't want to call them scammers, because they do know a little bit about social media, but the people that are are out there buying followers and then pitching two small businesses like hey, I can help you grow, you're following for x amount of dollars. That that puts a bad relationship on people like myself who are trying to grow an actual business around social media, just because we get the bad rep of beating young and like, Oh, we've worked with someone young before and they didn't know what they were doing and we paid them so much money we just lost it. So I would always like for all the small business owners out there always try to look out for you guys, always be wary of WHO's coming at you and always look at sort of their follower to engagement rates, because it's really easy to buy followers out there. Even on Linkedd you can buy too. So it's a it's an interesting place. Yeah, it is. Is Pretty Clean. Interesting to see it and be in a something I sink crazy things. I'll need to know with people people pay people to lot manage the social media accounts and post things, hold them into you know, to make social media accounts like quite profitable business. When you think, I mean that's what that's what I can do for companies. I don't think there's necessarily anything wrong in the content creation side of things, because you're essentially their marketer. They're just outsourcing it out to you. What I have a hard time wrapping my head around is, like there's lated engagement pods. Not sure if you've heard of what those are, but basically what a lot of people, a lot of people will do this on Linkedin is you'll have a group of friends, whether their friends are just people that you don't know, and let's just say there's a group of ten people. The way the linked an algorithm works is the more engagement that you get on your post, the higher that they boosted on the algorithm. Essentially, that's how it supposed to work. So what these people will do is though, joy like ten or twenty of these groups that are all filled with ten to twenty people, and then they'll post something and then what the Group's requirement is is when they post something on Linkedin, they send the link into all their groups and everyone that's a part of the group will have to liken comment on that post. So then that one post gets all GATTING, like fifty comments, and then it boost is up on algorithm and people are seeing this content. That's why you'll see a lot of people with really bad content show up on your feet consistently. Is because sometimes there are part of these groups. I mean I know people that are part of twenty, thirty, forty groups at a time and that's how they built some of their followings. And I mean, if that's your grind, that's your grind. It's not me. I don't feel right necessarily doing that, but I do know that people are are doing that. It's called linked in pods. They had them on Instagram to like it was a thing on other platforms. It's just because of the way that the Linkedin Algorithm works that that is how the top, like some of the top creators, are are continuing to keep their numbers up, so to say. Well, the vine frame, they'll the how long would that take if you did a post and you, you and other for friends can engage on this kind of moved to make the open mot okay without taking the time when I take a couple of hours or with that, how how long about blue? So was the usually they try to do it within the first hour, because I think that that's how the our that's what they say, that I'll Gar them, is like depending on how your engagement is on the first hour. But I don't...

...necessarily see that that's true with my content. Some of my stuff, like will start off really slow and then all of a sudden, like six or eight hours later, it really take off. But I think, I think what people will do usually is they just comment whenever they run across it. Like imagine if you're in twenty of these groups, right, and these people that are part of these groups are posting anywhere between one to three times a day, so you're having to comment on sixty two a hundred post a day. It's actually insane, right. She's so like, how do you even keep up with that with a full time job? That's what that's what doesn't make sense. A lot of the times it's actually crazy. Like there's this one guy that I talked with and I was like, Hey, like would want to, would love to be under podcast. I'm getting like two hundredzero views of my content. On linkedin, like I think it'd be a unique thing to talk about it on your store, on your podcast below blah. And his response back was, oh, I'm getting five hundredzero views of my stuff. I'm like, okay, like I wasn't here to to showcase that I was getting a lot of views. I just use that as a talking point and talk about linked did and he's like our first hit back with five hundred thousand. And I just check this page the other day and within the past twenty four hours he posted sixteen times and I was like, well, yeah, if I posted sixteen times of the day, I would get a million views a month, right, because they posted sixteen times a day, times thirty days. That's a crap sort of cup. That's like a hundred plus post of a month. I posed one. I post three to five ten, three to five times a week. So it's actually insane what some of these people are doing on Linkedin and when you dive into it a little bit more, but just because I have the eye and I understand how social media works, I can see it and that's why I always feel bad for a lot of these small business owners because they have their whole business to worry about. They don't want to just worry about social media. So I try to get the awareness as much as possible out there to to anyone out there who might be looking for like social media help. I think Muss so important. When you just said we got a love businesses. You know, you said you know that guy whoever is personal this and then you know these businesses never but we got a business took off the develop the time. Probably sometimes power stop that much when they've got that personal life and then the business matter phenoms and it's nice that you can kind of helped them with them and look kind of show them how social media works and kind of, you know, get that business open run they provide your providing value to them on I'm not going to soil about it. Yeah, I mean that's that's what I tell all my clients is I'm here to build your brand, however you want to do. If you want to post all the time, so be it. If you want to post once in a while, so be it, but I want to speak your brand. Essentially, it's your braind it's not my brand. So my my value always is helping brands tell their story on social media. So I do that through contact creation. I think a lot of people find value in that, especially CEOS, because a lot of CEOS art storytellers right their business, they run businesses and they have all of that to worry about. So for me to be able to take off that pressure off of their shoulders, I think as a that's why my clients love working with me. Not as great coming. Well, you work with any would you work many businesses, as it could be from my a small business like a cafe, so like, you know, a major corporate company business, which is a very, I would say, your clients or focused on. So I mean so I think most of my clients are usually just because of the ORLANDOM market, it's a smaller startups. Yeah, yeah, they're really looking for the brand building side of things because there are be tob business and it will land them that many people are using, using linkedin. So they're able to kind of cut a niche and that that Pie essentially for themselves. So...

...that's what I'm focus on right now. I do I'm working with a couple higher ed institutions right now to see how I can work with them. So, though, that's sort of in the books to work with more corporate entities, but we'll see where we're kind of the future goes. I've only been doing this for about like seriously, for like six months or so, so it's it's been an interesting, interesting couple months with it. It's been fun. O. CAN'T COMPLAIN ABOUT IT. Yeah, and it's it's like thin quotes that Govi says. I always kind of think about it. He says like he's enjoying the process, like the process and just to focus on the end goal come offin you have to kind of enjoy that growing, you know, being the moment we've how full was going. Yeah, I think that's the that's the best part is the people that you meet along the way, at least it is for me. Like one of the first people that I've ever reached out to you on Linkedin, who to bring it back on the topic of like mentorship and everything like that, he he became we reached out on Linkedin. He sort of became my mentor in terms of sales and everything like that, because he's a chief sales officer and he's Ha has decades of experience and that space, and then I sort of mentored him in the Linkedin world and we've just been talking to each other for the past I don't know, year, year and a half or so, and I've worked with his company and we actually just started a linked in course together. We worked on it together. So that launch and that's pretty crazy, but that's that's really what I love about entrepreneurship and and being able to build relationships with people is you don't know where it's going to lead. Like I literally went to this guy's workshop at a lunch and learn hit them up. Things kind of happened in between. Didn't hear from it for a couple months and then all of a sudden we've been working with each other for the past six to twelve months or so in some way, shape or form. So that's that's the beauty of mentorship and business is you don't know where things will end up, but that's just how the world comes to works. If it's almost like a ripple effect, isn't it? By you kind of much in a lake, you throw stone in the lake, in the ripples, kind of like you know Scots amongst you know, along the water. That's kind of how it is, isn't it? You kind of you put your foots on at Ale bit in those ripples then stop even and then you do anottle bit and then you connect to little people and of things and the build connections on you and it just kind of goes from now, suppose. Yeah, it's it's like you said, it's ripple fact, right, you surround yourself with good people, they know good people and that they introduce you to other good people and it just kind of builds from there. And that's that's probably one of the funniest things that I've learned. Like my girlfriend would always say, like why don't you have any friends that are our age? Right, because I'm twenty and twenty three and most of my friends are like thirty plus forty years old or so. Yeah, they all have like kids and families and stuff, and I'm like yeah, like, I don't really have that many friends that are my age just I haven't really been able to find them. But it's it's funny that that's just how it works. But again, that's that's life. Yeah, it's you know about the law of attraction and things like that. Yeah, of course, of course, it's like Bison as well, you know, they the energy that you admit and connecting with the same energy. Well, we know that other people are on. I don't think you definitely feel that you could something with you. When you tune into it and you use it's something that you becomes more aware. You become more aware of it. Yeah, one hundred percent. The more you use something, the better it gets. HMM. I think that's like social media. I find that social media muscle. It's bit like a muscle because, like when I post, if I know, if I post, I know for a couple of days or climb, I'm making content. If I don't do it for like...

...a week or a few days, it's almost like it's like you have to kind of get back in the driver seat, so speak. So, yeah, like the more you do it, the more the bus you get out of it. Yeah, I mean it's just practice, right, and whether you're on social media, are constantly posting on social media, sort of the effect that you'll feel is you're there, you'll start to see what good content sort of looks like and when you see what good content looks like, then you can sort of find the bits of pieces from it and put it onto your own content. And that's what I always tell people that I work with is, yes, I will be helping you create your content and write your content and everything like that, but I need you to be commenting and liking every single day as well, because you're going to help a boost of your profile on the Algorithm, but also be you'll start to understand what good content looks like, so that when you're going over my post after I write it for you, you can see, Oh yeah, I like that, or hey, can we try this too? And that's what I like, is that engagement back and forth. I don't necessarily just like Oh, here, Justin here's a topic that I want to write about. Here goes do it, and then I send it to them to okay, cool, post it. I want to hear of like okay, I think we can mess around with but this a little bit, or I really like this. I didn't like that. Like, I want to work with you, I want to get your voice and hear you so that eventually you can do it on your own and I'm not always working with you as a as a contractor consultant. Yeah, no, exactly. Well, with the IT's better to say you do say someone of those light full posts and space of like two weeks. It's better to how those full posts being really, really good post time pulling it, rather than put out of twenty pieces of content which having had not much put into it and not much volume, because I've been on some people's pages where they've got like twenty posts or thirty pros and then you know they could be better. And you know, I think I've done it with my own content, and you know when I was creating things for instagram and the only days things I just kind of rushed. I just want to get out there. But if you want shopping, you spend time on something, you get it great more of an impact and product provides more value. Doesn't happening? Yeah, it's a fine balance. Right. It's a fine balance, because you look at someone like Gary v who puts out out own five hundred pieces of content every single day, right, and his whole his whole thing is that at least one of those things will pop. That's this thing, right. Well, at least one of those things will pop, but with let's just take I'm not sure if you know who Mr Beast is. Yes, is that you super? He's a huge youtuber. Really blew over the past year. Every single video that he put out has over ten million views. Right, and it's actually insane what he does for his videos, but he will only put out something that he truly likes. He'll spend two hundred fiftyzeros on a video and weeks of editing and he won't put it out just because he doesn't think that it's at the level of his quality. So it really depends on the type of person you are. You have to be either a Gary v I think, or you have to be a Mr Beast type of person. I don't think there's really a medium in between, and that's what I think a lot of people play in. They try to be a little bit of both. I think you have to pick one or the other and kind of go all in on that. Hmmm, I so fascinate. It's talk about because you know like social you social media about you know ful kind of podcasting from my coaching that I'm stilling to do in probably the reason all that a year, you and a half. You know to to for...

...a couple of years, but kind of more so now, more into it, because you know you, like I said, you see the algorithms, you see the impact and I think you're always learning with it on you something that you don't stop learning with, especially with tick tock as well. I mean other know d what do you think about Tick Tock? So I don't personally use tick tock like I use it as a consumer, but I have in used it as a creator. So say, it's a super interesting platform and I think they had it down packed in terms of social media growth, because they're the only platform, at least that I've seen, that has allowed you to easily share tick tocks onto other platforms, and I think that's the yahiggest reason why they've exploded, because they've given the ability to the creator. Now right, if, if you want to share something from instagram to twitter, it's incredibly hard and they don't like that. If you want to share, yeah, something on Linkedin that's not on Linkedin, they hate that and they will push you down on the Algorithm, whereas Tick Tock, if you want to share a tick tock onto snapchat, there's an integrated button where all you have to click is that snapchat logo and it brings you into snapchat. It's so easy. Same thing with twitter, same thing with Instagram, everything like that, and every single time that you re share it onto a platform, you get the little tick tock what's it called? Water mark on your video, branded all the way, doing all the right things, and I think that's why it's absolutely exploded over the past year or so. I think it's going to continue to explode. I just don't have the time right now to put towards it. I mean I probably should put out some videos, but it's not top of mine, but I'm definitely paying attention to it. Yeah, this is pretty fascinating. That's going to blown up because, I mean I remember, I thought fly years ago came out and I remember looking on I think those long just ten, ten different things on the feed and I was a look as this is punched. So I was long, I'm going to eat this and adolay and then, Guy, we be told about it. That was all my God, by what the Hell, can't dude tick tocks crazy? My girlfriend literally just talking tick tocks now she's just walks around the house doing dances and talking and tick Tock memes. It's as actually insane how much it's taken over my life without me actually creating on the platform. I think it's a fun it's good for like the main audience on it, a lot younger people. Isn't it like twin ages of fifteen to line, you know, our age in the S. I don't know, I wouldn't even say that anymore. Like there's a quite a few older people on the platform, especially now because of all the celebrities that have popped on it over the past couple months. It's it's it's becoming a pretty pretty large audience in terms of like demographics that that are on it. Maybe not necessarily facebook's audience is on there, but I definitely think instagram's audience is on there. So you'll be you'll see at people on there anywhere between, I don't know, eight years old, probably up to like forty or fifty years old, because I see parents. They put their babies on there and their babies always go viral because everyone loves seeing a baby. So you like you're starting to get the older audience and you're starting to get those like old sort of cat videos that used to go always go viral on Youtube, sort of the same type of con said, that goes viral on on Tick Tock. Yeah, that's crazy. The Internet's pretty amazing, though, when you think of asn't...

...like what we can do and just how the world works. I mean I add find out hard to think how it would be about the Internet now. I remember the LA using face. I remember using MSN, messenger and my space, though, the first kind of platforms I used, you know, when I was at school. Well, you've gone like facebook, leads and all of these and it just keeps on growing. I think you know there's so much potential and I think you know this is the way forward. You know this is the way forward and I think people need to like look into it into yeah, I think. I think the Internet is, it is the ultimate leveler when it comes to career development, whether your career development is in the professional space and continue to grow and climb that Corporal Ladder, or your career development is owning and starting a business. The Internet provides you all the knowledge in the world. Now now it really comes down to how good are you actually like? Where's your talent and how much are you willing to execute on? And so those are the two biggest differentiators now and that's why you're starting to see so many, so many different people succeed from all walks of life. Like you put Mark Zuckerberg fifty years ago, and I guarantee you he's not becoming the Mark Nuckenberg that we know today, because he's a very introverted, techy type of guy. Almost all of those tech people, I don't think would succeed fifty years ago, but because of the time being of the Internet and how you can, for lack of better words, like high behind a computer and be really smart behind the computer but build really great things still, that's what's really led to this tech revolution that we've seen in the past. Yeah, I was like these cashole Willens coding. That's a big thing. That's that's mullins spot. There's some of the layers to the inspement as well as I think, especially with generation and the generations are kind of being born into it. You know, you don't Kurds on my small phones in a lot eight or ten years old. It's like crazy. Yeah, it's crazy. With the whole esports gaming thing. I mean now you've got you got kids that are twelve years old competing for hundreds of thousands of dollars on fortnight and and games like that like it's it's absolutely insane what the Internet has done with the world. I think it's done a lot better that it has worse. I mean I mean, we're still experimenting with it. It's only been what like Twenty Ish, twenty five years old, so to say. So, like it's still relatively new and I don't think people understand that. And that's what we're going to continue to sort of play around with, a mess with, for the next couple decades, I would say, before we really see what the effects are, especially with social media. But I do think the netfect is positive, though. Yeah, often there's a lot more positive than negative. But I think ever really mentioned something about, like is it where it was going to be going towards his love Voice Recognition v all things like that. I'm a kind of kind of see that with voice recognitional you can kind of just talk to phone and they'll do something for you. Yeah, I still haven't gotten used to doing stuff like that. I know my dad has, because he hated texting. So I'll just talk into his his his phone. So He's actually adopted that more than I have, which is really funny because he's like the one of the least tech savvy people in in my family. Yeah, but it's a I think that that...

...probably is the future, but I think it's going to take some time to really adapt to it, and I don't think it will happen until like the kids that are now beginning college sort of graduate and start having a professional life, because that's when they can start to buy the Google homes and integrate their whole house rather like even just me, like I have a google, I have google here, Google home and a google many, but I haven't bought like the lights or anything like that, yes, yet. So that's what I mean, like once we start to get into more stabilized careers and we were able to buy, like integrate all these smart things into our house, that I do think that is the future, but I think that's so at least like a decade away. Yes, this is crazy, the way from this going. I'll be on play station with my friends and my mainstballe sue, but I like so turn on the lights or something lap and I'm like what. Yeah, I've got a buddy who has all his whole living room is all linked up so he can tell Alexa to din the lights, to turn into movie mode, to pretty much everything and turn up and down the speakers. It's all conducted through his Alexa and it's it's pretty crazy. I'm just not a level yet I find it really sketchy, though, because off go I'm as a music on my phone and at times I'll be playing music and it's going to Alexa thing go into it where you can say Alexo, play away sis or a certain mut certain so sometimes I'll be driving and it will just it will bleep like you want to talk to it by itself. So I think like sometimes I'm is in kind of listening sometimes. Yeah, I mean I think what we're at least from my understanding, just because I've learned a little bit about ads and how everything works like that and and how insurance is looking to use ai into the future, is I think we're just going to give up all of our information and the future for for just complete transparency. I mean, like, if you think about ads and facebook, right, they have literally every single information about you that is important, right, what you're going to do, where you live, your phone number, your email, what you're looking at, what you're spending time looking at and everything like that. Because think about it, when we're watching TV, there was no way to tell if someone was actually watching that ad before, whereas now facebook can look at your look at your scroll, see what you stopped at see how long you stopped at it, and if you stopped at it for a long enough time, then they can retarget you for another ad because you stopped at that thing for such for a certain amount of period at time. And same thing with Youtube, same thing with Google, everything like that. That's what people don't understand. Like they were, they're already at that point where they pretty much know everything about us. Like I know in the insurance world, they're getting to the point where AI's able to predict, if you plan, if they think you're going to get a divorce, and if they if you do think that, they do think that you're going to get a divorce, they will up your premium because you're more likely to get X, Y and Z in the in the future. She needs it, and that's all done through Ai, just because there's so many dots that you can connect with all the data points that want a computer sift through it. They can do that easily with code, but if a human wanted to go through all that data, it would take hundred of thought thousands of years. So it's it's pretty crazy all the data that's already out there and I don't think people realize that until they truly understand how these social media platforms work. Yeah, then the the social media advertising world, if you really understand what it...

...is, then it's it's crazy. Like I know that there's a strategy on Youtube where, if you create a youtube video right about a specific topic, like very specific topic, you get three to four hundred people to watch your video, which doesn't seem like a lot on the outside. But then if, let's say you have three or four hundred people that view it, out of those three or four hundred people, two hundred people watch five minutes of your video. You can then tell Google to retarget those people that watch five minutes of your video to a specific ad about your your video or whatever it is, and then you can get them the sign up for a course, which that you put them into a funnel and it leads to X, Y Z. But because you can tell it's someone actually paid attention to your stuff, that means that they're more credible buyer than if you just place the TV ad and you don't even know if that person's actually watch you that or if they've just switched to another channel. Right. Because, I mean, we're younger and I remember the days when we would watch nickelodeon on one channel and didn't have cartoon network on the other. Yeah, and when one was on commercial, you just switch to the other right. You know, technically you're still viewing both networks and you're not able, you're able now to steal difference between that because of social media and all the tracking that they have. Shit crazy world and it was a going up. And if you watch Joe Rogan podcast, me an episode with a guy called Adam Curry, who can't he saw it off throwing and he's the first guy who started podcasts. He's quite clever guy and he's done a lot of other stuff as well. He was basically saying that he kind of keeps his privacy very brief, like with these APPs. He said he's got like an old knock umvol flip phone kind of phone, and then he's got his iphone with a few others in case it needian needs to use it for business. But he said he doesn't put any of his information, tries not to put any of his information like into these APPs and creatives accounts because he doesn't his information. You know, pin shed, I think it's so hard now to to not share your person information, but even if you create like a google account, I'll google phone. If you want to, other know, have an email account, you have to put in so much information. If you get well, it's just so easy, right, and it's you want it to be so easy, right, if you create a Google if you don't have a google account, you can't act as doctor, can't access sheets. But if you do, you can get it all, you can use it wherever and whatever you want. And they've these tech companies are they're so smart. They've made everything so easy, and I mean with facebook and instagram. I mean I made a facebook when I was what like eleven or twelve years old probably, and I didn't know what I was putting I was just putting in things that made sure that my age was over eighteen, because that's what I did on every website just so that I can get access to it. The same thing with Instagram, right. I probably made an instagram when I was a sophomore in high school. I don't understand privacy. No one reads those things, they just click except and then. So, yeah, that's that, but that's that's the world that we live in now. I think they're too big and too big of a part that of our lives. That I don't think there's any any way to take them out, so to say, which is interesting to see how out it'll play out with Ay thy kind of. But they they run from though that it's kind of hard, you know, to not use apple or windows or Google platforms, because the the thought, the put it, the they're the ones who dictate what happens. When I was interesting talk while,...

...though, because you know the same much to it isn't a definitely meant, it's a it's a top two. You are read at all? Do you have any lot books that you like to read or you inter reading? I don't read a whole lot, but I have read a couple books that I truly do think provide a lot of value for people. I think one of them is the third door. Not sure if you've ever heard of it, but it's a book by what's his name, Alex, Alex Baniyan, and he is basically this eighteen year old kid. It's his journey of how use an eighteen year old kid in college at USC he doesn't really understand what he wants to do with his life because his daughter, his mom and his dad wanted to become a doctor, but he doesn't want to do that, but he has no real resources to go out on his own. So what he decides to do? Of instead of studying for a test, he decides to figure out how to hack the prices right, because they're filming the show the next day, day and his test, I believe, and so he gets on the prices right, hacks it, wins like a hundred fiftyzero to two hundred fifty thousand dollars or something crazy like that, and like boats and prizes and stuff. So he sells all that, takes the cash and he goes on this adventure to meet like the Bill Gates of the world, the Maya, and to lose etc. So this book is about his theory, about what he calls the third door, where, let's just say you're trying to get into a nightclub, there's three ways to go in. The first way is you just wait in line like everyone else and you wait hours upon hours for the chance to maybe get in. The second way is you're a VIP, which he wasn't at the time, and they just let you in. So he couldn't do that. But the third door, which is open to everyone, but no, what thinks about is you go around the corner, you bag on the back door until someone let you in, and that's what he did and that's what he uses money and that's what he did to talk to all these people. So this book is about his adventure of how he got in touch with all these people, as well as some of the conversations that they had and the advice that they had for him. It's a really interesting book and it's it's something that really shaped what I've been able to do on linked I use that same concept of just not being scared of reaching out to people and it's been able to open some doors that I never would have thought of that would open up to me. So it's been crazy, nice, amazing and I'll fol once you kind of kind of jump over that legends and see in the unknown of the public becomes more easier to do and she just take action and just do it exactly. Now. I have to check that book out. It sounds really good and that's that's what true stories it's like kind of this guy. Yeah, yeah, it's a true story. Yeah, that's interesting. That what you said about things like ways to get into a nightclub, because I've seen that in ques like. I think, like as people like, we just conform and we follow what other people are doing and we don't know's necessarily take a step back and think of other waves. But they're in front of us, but we didn't know it. Don't we don't jump to the opportunity. Half the time I've found that in a supermarket like in the UK, is like a corporative, which is probably a bit like a warm up in America, and there's self check out aisles where you can can you can buy things, go to self checkout scanning pay for it. I was in there like theve a week and there was a big, long queue and there was queuing at this till and there's one old lady,...

...like you know, scumming ons and I looked at the self check out. On them was six empty toes that people could just scun and their own bits and then leave. But those about fifteen people in this cure and I was like what they doing? Well, why, I just jumped some self check out, just scumed it went out. You know, that was you know, like you said, there's always a lot of other ways to go about things, but people were just conform. I think called time. Yeah, I mean it's always the people that that do something different that really truly succeed right and it's the people that find I like that third door analogy that he uses in the book. For instance, he tells the story about Steven Spielberg. So everyone knows Steven Spielberg as this amazing movie producer, but no one understand no one really has dove deep, or at least for me, like I didn't know the story of how he got his start. And the way that he got his start was he went on a universal studios tour at the theme park. So we just went to the backlots. Basically, he jumped off the tour, hit it a bath room until the tour left and then he went out walked around till he found someone that would give him a pass. When the person that gave him a pass gave him a pass for like five days or something like that, he walked in every day, became friends with the security guard so that on the fifth day and his past expired, he took his dad's suit and his dad's beefcase and walked in like he still was allowed on the place, basically and just said Hey, John, let's see you today. The security. I said, let's going on, Steven, let's you today. Just let him in, because he just thought she that he's there. And that is so true. Like I've died, I've I got into conferences just having the confidence is just walk through like it works. And that's what people don't realize. But that's what it takes to be successful, especially when you start from a place of not necessarily having a lot and the name, like nobody knew Steven Spielberg but then, but everyone knows him now. But he had to get to that point and that's what you don't get. That's amazing. Not so true, like the free of the anyway, because why, you know, if you don't take OCS, and my girlfriend said to me something like if you don't take action, which is num if you try and you fell, okay, they's just know. But you know, try and you you know, if you get, you know, you should see you down. Suggest you know. Either way, you know, whether you try or you don't, I'm still going to be no, but it's bed to try, because then you don't grow of law. You know, not attempting it exactly one hundred percent. Gods fust name. What would you sell? You like motivation? Is there anything? You kind of watch a line what kind of like guess you will come ready to do what you done. I mean, the number one thing that motivates me is, yeahbably, my parents story. I rarely resonate to their ability to just give me an amazing life that I have today. When I look back and understand that, like my grant, my grandfather, he graduated college in two years without knowing English when he came over to the states, and I'm like, what the heck, like I have no excuse, right. And he's his name is on several patents because he helped, he became an engineer and helped create the lot of the first computer fans to keep the computers from overheating. So I'm like, well, if this guy can graduate college in two years and have patents under his name, like I have no excuse that I can't I can't work hard in my buy a one on one class or whatever it is right. So when I look back at that, I'm like...

...my situation is way better than what my parents had, my grandparents had. I just need to continue to keep working and keep grinding, because if they are able to do it, I have no years now to thats amazing. I'm Miss Amazing and you know, hot soft to your family. You Know Full For da've accomplished them done. I mean, you know, a conqulting imudgin come of being not snowing a situation, but you know, you know. I think hard times and situations like that, you're a kind of give that motivation to people don't know and they given the kids in that drive. When you come from a certain place like that, when you know you've got that in your family, gives you that kind of like momentum to do, want to do what it succeeded? Doesn't exactly, because I think like a lot of these successful people, like you know, a dot out, you know about really hard times or really hard lives or things that happened, and it kind of think it build use a person, doesn't it? Yeah, I mean it's it takes a lot to understand where a lot of people come from and when you get brought up in hardship, you really understand the true value of the things around you, whether it's money or, more importantly, time, and I think that's what a lot of people who come from hardship truly understand, is how valuable time is to them. So I think that's that's the number one thing. Yeah, no, exactly. I mean I'll find it pretty motivates and, like you know, my girlfriend is from Lithuania and she came full of the when it's to the donuts kingdom till I go to university. So she graduated in the fushion design. Pretty sure it's function. She graduated and she know she's in a good, good role in the minute. You know not. That takes a lot, doesn't it? It's takes a lot to go from a guide conference zone got into the own a country that you don't know. I fing about, you know, study and working. You know, it's, in truth, something we should do. We should talk people who've done bigger things, done knows and things. A fund of the Wood scale was, you know, kind of inspires you to do more, doesn't it? Yeah, one hundred percent. It's it's crazy. It's it's crazy that people are are able to to make that transition in their life. Right, I could have never imagined it, but it's it's something that people, some people have to do and I commend them for to be able to make that leap. It's it's it's the American dream over here in the US and I truly believe it's still alive and I think that people can still see it. It's it's the beauty of the freedom that we have over here, which I can't complain about. Yeah, there's so much opportunity and the options for those I want to New York. My friend and channel pretty amazing blows. Yeah, man, New York is its own animal. It's a crazy thing. I'm out in Orlando and I mean I love or lingo. It's a great place to be, but it's not it's not nearly as crazy as New York. Yeah, but dude, I got I have to hop off in a couple minutes. So if you have any other questions, would love to any quick questions. Would love to year yet those where...

I gotta go. Yeah, sure, by what would you any long kind of message you would say to people listening, like my motivation online kind of come on out words to wisdom, I mean, the only thing that I can say that I feel like I'm justified to say because I'm just getting started my career and by no means in my business coach or anything like that, but the way that I was able to find my sort of foot my footing in the world is by just trying things. If you feel like you're stuck, just try something and it can be one of the scariest things that you do in your life. But I guarantee you, maybe not your first dry, maybe not your second try, maybe not even your third try when doing something, but eventually you'll figure out that one thing that you are passionate about and that you can wake up every single day and want to actually do. But you will never find that by just continue to do the same things over and over and over again. You gotta keep you have to try something, and that's what I tell students. That's why I tell older people, that's why tell people are my age, and it seems to just be advice that's applicable to almost anyone out there who's not a hundred percent satisfied with whatever they're doing. No, I really, I really appreciate you'll you know, coming on the podcast already very humbled and grateful for your time and Prettyman's a lot, of course. Thank you so much for having me. I really appreciate it. that. Nah, so cook my any time, any time I have to do another one. That some stage all right, but I did not really means a lot. Thank you and a great day. No, thank you to yeah, whatever you want to have me back on, just feel free to reach back out and then we'll we'll figure something something out in the future, right. I appreciate love being on and until next time then. Yeah, sure, mom, take it easy you as well. Like.

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