Sounder SIGN UP FOR FREE
The Parrsitivity Podcast
The Parrsitivity Podcast

Episode 85 · 2 years ago

The Parrsitivity Podcast #Episode 18 With Dr. Reagan B Anderson

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Dr. Reagan B. Anderson is a dermatologist in Colorado Springs, Colorado and is affiliated with multiple hospitals in the area, including Penrose-St. Francis Health Services-Colorado Springs and UCHealth Memorial Hospital. He received his medical degree from A.T. Still University Kirksville College of Osteopathic Medicine and has been in practice between 11-20 years. He is a Board certified Dermatologist, surgeon, Ex military: First reconnaissance battalion surgeon 2004-06 Iraq/Semper fi. Health President AOCD, Author of his book: Universal Health Care: A Solution for healthcare in the Age of Entitlement. Has a master's degree in theology/theological studies. In today's Podcast we talk about the current situation with Covid-19, mindset, health & wellbeing, society, energy, diet, immune system, success, law of attraction, energy, people, PTSD, personal experiences. https://www.linkedin.com/in/reagan-anderson-1a5890144 --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/the-parrsitivity-podcast/message

Hi, welcome to the postivity podcast. In today's episode I'm with Doctor Reagan Anderson. He is a board certified dermatologist, surgeon health, president for a OCD, publisher and Co founder for the doctor's quarterly. He was also a first reconnaissance battalion surgeon for two years in sympathy with the US Marine Corps, as a Master's degree in theological studies and much, much more. So sit back, relax and enjoy this podcast. In today's podcast we talked about the current situation of the coronavirus, health, mindset, well being and how to unlock your true potential in looking after yourselves as a human being. So enjoy right, Reagan. Hello, hi, that. Can you hear me? Hello, I can't hear you. Can hear me? How about now? Can you hear me now? Yeah, Hey, you find yeah, good. How's the audio quality? Yes, it's okay, I can hear you. Fine, you hear me? Okay, loud and Claire, we move the microphone a little bit closer here. Is that better? Yeah, that's that's perfect. Perfect. I just want to say, master, thank you for coming on the podcast. Really really means a lot. Oh, thank you for the invitation I'm honored. This is your baby, so I'm honored when people invite me into their world. So thank you. No, you welcome. I just you're quiet. You've got quite oppressive. Impressive say profile like you've bought it to our dermatologist, surgeon, health, president, the a OCD, publisher and use a war medic with the first reconnaissance battalion surgeon for a couple of years and Iraq con'. Pronounce this Felusia. Simplify, to semplify, agree, simplify, artempire. You Master's degree in theology, theologic, caring to say theology, feology. You got it. Yeah, pretty amazing. Thank you. It's been a it's been a great journey so far. kind of what kind of got you into this? On a lot walk on the spot, getting into this profession for you love. Well, you know, I honestly, when I was in seminary, I thought I had a calling to help people, to heal them, and so I applied to medical school and I got in. Now, to full transparency, I did lose my faith in a rack. So you know, they say there's no atheists and foxholes. That's where I lost my faith and I've been slowly rebuilding that relationship over the last thirteen, fourteen years. So yeah, I felt a calling to do this. This, this is felt like what I was made to be. Hm. No, it's amazing. They would to be in you know, to make a difference people's lives and help them. You know well, you know, if you can help someone and makes your lots better, isn't a hundred percent. You know, used to bother me when I would volunteer or go on a missions trip, whether that was with the church or with the military or or just a regular old organization, I always found that I gained more than I then I gave, and it bothered me for a long time because I wanted to give more than I got. But a you know, it's one of the beautiful truths in life and in the world is that you always get more than you give and and that's a beautiful truth. It's like striving to be a better person and you will yesterday, isn't it consent? There's stundancy. So it is. You know, I'm always curious when, especially politicians, get attacked by changing their mind on something. You know, they thought something twenty or thirty years ago and they've changed their mind and they get attacked for that, and I've always been curious with that, because if I'm the same person today that I was ten years...

...ago, Adam, I think I kind of have squandered the last ten years. And we should always be growing, we should always be improving, we should always be processing new information, new realities and and changing our minds. Now, hopefully we're not talking about the extremes where you know you are an absolutely horrible mass murder or something like that and you've changed to not murdering people anymore. I'm not talking about the extremes of the pendulum here. I'm talking about as we grow, as we learn more, that we become more and if we aren't doing that, something is really, really wrong. I mean, I hope the whole world learns from this covid crisis so that when the next pandemic comes, and as certain as the Sun will rise tomorrow, we will get another pandemic. It might be in a year, it might be in a hund endears, but another one will come. That's that's the nature of the biology of the reality that we live in, and so I'm hoping that we all learn from this. We I think the entire planet was caught unawares and I think we're dealing with that now the best way we can. But if we don't learn from this, you know, shame on us and I think that we should be learning constantly everything. Look at everything as an opportunity, and that's one of the things. When this, when anything, quote unquote, undesirable or bad happens to me, I've learned to say, okay, this is awesome. How am I going to learn, how am I going to contribute? How am I going to become, and when you shift your mindset to that, instead of being a victim or being upset or whatever, woe's me, or why does this always happened to me? You know, I'm not sure any of those mindsets get us anywhere, but definitely the mindset of okay, what am I going to learn? How am I going to become, how am I going to contribute? It just makes everything a challenge, it makes everything utilizing all of your potential to help and and at the end of the day you sleep better because you've done better. They agree with what you just said, and I think you know we've. We've what's happening down the world is a Mussive, mussive way up quote. I think you know for businesses, the business wild. I think you know. You know all the society really kind of you know makes you think about. You know our actions and what we've been doing. You know to know, you know the effects on the planet, the environment, and I think you know a lot of I've heard people say that where the government and the military. You know they've had all their worries and thinking that. You know, the next big thing that's going to happen. As you know, another country attacking. You know the country whereas you know, a lot more focus needs to be put into, you know, this kind of stuff with viruses and germs and pandemics, like anything more. Focus on that a hundred percent. So let me ask you a personal question if I can. So we have we know that, I don't know, somewhere between seventy and ninety percent of people who are hospitalized with the covid virus, so people who get really sick with it, not just miserable but really sick. We know that they have other health conditions. Almost all of them do their diabetic or they smoke or they have heart disease or lung disease. And almost all of those can be enormously prevented with a little bit of intention every day of the proper diet and exercise. So my question to you is, how has this pandemic changed your lifestyle in real ways so that you can become as healthy as possible, which, by the way, will increase your potential and everything in your life? So how is it going to affect you? I feel like it's affective me workwise. You know the kind of job I was doing. You know, kind of finished, because obviously we're places closed. I think by health wise, it's it kind of makes you think more, be more mindful of, you know, the Foodjuri and kind of levels of exercise that you do to you know, carry out in your day, because you know you're with yourself a lot more now. You kind of focuses on you. So I I mean I'm quite fortunate where I live in the in this part of the UK. It's near, it's the south coast, so I've got I've got beaches close by, the places where I can go for a run, you know, around where I live, and I'm very you know, I'm very lucky to be in that position where I can go for a run if I wish to, and I can you work out our home, which I've been doing, you know, every morning. Nice, Nice, nice, but I find, you know, it's when you're at home you I find that you know you're in your comfort zone and it's a challenge to get out of your...

...comfort zone at home, to be able to work out at home. If you know to me, I'm sure it takes a little bit of intention. I mean the first step is always the hardest. So I I know there's times when I come home from day of work and I'm just tired. I sit down on the couch and I know that if I just get up off the couch and make that move to my basement, I have a small gym in my basement, just basically it's a bedroom that I have empty floor space on so I can work out in and if I just take that step, just get off the couch and take that one step, the rest is easy. I've already committed, I've determined, I've I've made the decision to to make a healthful choice and I think a lot of us, we kind of lacks a dais acally go through our lives, whether that's with health or education or relationships and we don't just spend ten seconds, thirty seconds, saying this is what I'm going to do. So on Sundays I get a bunch of veggies out every Sunday. I didn't this last Sunday, I but almost at for the last year. I missed one Sunday because I've got time to do it during the day now. But I get out a bunch of Edgies, I chop them up, I put them into a little jars and then I've got my lunch for the entire week. Takes me about five minutes to prepare five lunches and it cost about a dollar, dollar fifty a lunch and it's just brilliant. So five minutes of intention has given me five very good meals. Another example is going to a party. If you go to a party, let's say the Covid isn't happening and you're going to an Easter brunch and a bunch of people you like there, but there's a couple you don't. If you focus in the car on our man, I've got to deal with this person and that person, the chances of you having a good time at the Easter Brunches is not going to be very good. But if you go there and say, Oh man, I'm so excited to talk to this person, to figure out what's going on with this other person and have some good food and and all of that sort of thing, then chances are you've set your intention, you've made a decision to find the good, to find the joy. Chances are you're going to. But so many of us we just don't spend that ten seconds, at thirty seconds, that five minutes a week to plan our meals and then we're we get blown by the wind and you just when you get blown by the wind, it's very unlikely you're going to wind up any spot you would actually choose to be it. Yeah, it's having not perspective, isn't it? It's just flip, not switch, of how you look at things and since and AIAS and it is and it's so easy to be seduced by the fear and the anger and all that stuff of the news. Now you know, I think we all need to pay attention to the news and not be informed of what's going on, not just for the COVID crisis, but informed in our world just enough so that we know what's going on and we know how to make a positive difference once you know enough to know what's going on, and it's kind of hard with all the misinformation that's out there these days, but no enough to know what's going on, know what you can do personally to make a positive difference on this planet, and that's where you stop. You don't just keep watching and watching and watching, because what you focus on will grow. And if all you're watching is the economy falling apart or you know the number of people who are in the hospital with covid you're going to eventually think that everybody's except for use in the hospital with covid and your turn is coming. So we need to socially isolate, we need to be responsible, but we do not need to wreck our psychees over any of these issues, because once you wreck your psyche over the issue, you're not going to have the emotional strength or intelligence or fortitude to actually do something positive about it. And if we all just drag ourselves into the ground be seduced by the news, then I what hope do we have? And I think that's quite contagious as well and I think it is quite easy for people to fold on that path like fail see, is quite you know, if we let our energy kind of get soaked in by fail you know, not only weakens immune system, you know, makes its anxious and not going to pass on to the people. Absolutely if you're worrying about something, someone else can stop worrying about their health and how they feeling. And it's a bit of a vicious circle. I mean the first kind of week this kind of all kicked off, I mean, I'm going to I mean not to them, and I was watching the news and I had to get my girlfriend off home, drove a bike and I'm the sitting of my car. I remember feeling just really anxious and kind of overwhelmed. HMM. I think it felt very strange because it was a Saturday night and I drove...

...back into the no cause in the room I was about the only car on the dual carriageway. I was the only guy at the petro station. So I felt scared because it was almost like something out of a film, right, and and I had a bit of a cough and I'd a bit of a sneeze at the time and I start worrying about if I got it, am I going to die? And it just I just spire myself into this kind of pit and I just had to take a few deep breaths and talk us one mom about it and I felt better afterwards. But, like you said, you've it doesn't help situation, does it, if we're going to stop playing it it. Yeah, there's there's some imaginary line that's crossed that all of a sudden it becomes unhelpful, unfruitful. And and then. So you know, all of us have an emotional home. All of us have a place that we're comfortable with. Some people are happy, some people are always angry, some people are sad or pessimistic or whatever, but all of us have this kind of baseline emotional home that we look for things in our environment to take us there. So right now in America, I'm not sure what it was like in the UK, but in America and eleven was one of those moments. So how you reacted to hundred and eleven tells you or your home as if you went out and tried to help, if you were sad, if you were those sorts of things. The same with the covid right. So this is a crisis. There's there's a nugget of truth in it and we have to pay attention to that truth and we have to have our own personal responsibility for what we need to do to flatten the curve and all that stuff and to be as individually healthy as possible so that we don't need hospitalization. So so we need enough of that. But whatever people are feeling right now, whatever they're taking it to the extreme with, that tells everybody where their emotional home is. So are you angry? Are You mad? Are you sad? Are you happy? Are you wanting to help? Are you wanting to get involved? Like that is where you live. And once we know what we will turn any situation in good, bad or in different we will try to get it to our emotional home. That's why there's some people out there that, you know, they win the lottery and they're mad because it was only ten million, not twenty million. You know that sort of thing. These these moments can instruct us and and show us where our strengths and vulnerabilities are, because once you know what your strengths and what your vulnerabilities are, then you actually are are have freedom to react every situation how you choose to react, not just how your emotional home tells you you have to react. It was one of the best things about Iraq for me. I mean there was a lot of horrible stuff in Iraq, but the opportunity in Iraq was I got to know who I was. I knew the limits of my abilities, I knew the good and the bad of my emotional home. And now that I'm aware of all that, my abilities, my weaknesses, where my home is, now I actually get to live life on my terms. You know, I have I have PTSD Atam and I every podcast time, on and and everywhere it's appropriate, I tell people I do. I mean I saw some really horrible things in Iraq and it opened my mind to realities that I hope that nobody else ever experiences or understands in life. But every morning I get up and I look that PTSD in the face and I say and I tell myself how I will react and how the day will go. I frame my day and now, instead of PTSD putting me on a street corner begging for food with a needle hanging out of my arm, instead of that it's actually turned into a positive, into a strength, into a how we can relate to other people who've had tragic things happen in their lives and how I can foresee how a tragedy is going to play out, so I can help people. Never get the emotional injury or the moral hazard that you or the moral injury that you can have. They never get it because I can. I can walk them through and say this is what you're going to experience, these are normal emotions and this is this is the reality of the situation. So all of us have these emotional homes, all of us have these spots that we go to and they can either be a strength, kind of like my PTSD has, or they can be a weakness like a lot of veterans on the street corner have in America, because they have not chosen to make it a reality that supports their potential. Instead, they made it a reality that drags them into the ground and they kind of get labeled and then that kind of drives them serv down, doesn't it? Because then, you know, society labors them and then they feel like they haven't got much hope or choice and then it's just like that. You know, a bit of a spiral, isn't it? It is. But yeah, but with what you said and what PTSD. I had it myself actually...

...the number of years ago, when I was a teenager, I had an accident where I fell through a sky light on a roof. I Sup with PTSD and anxiety, you know, and things for a couple of years and I think it was like your Postuma, isn't it? So you kind of experienced homer afterwards and I thought I was going to die. That's the kind of thought that I had, that one through my head when I fell through that roof. Wow, kind of thought, a playing out of my life. Thought like what you said, you know, you work through it and it's how you kind of use that and you ever see it as like a weakness or a strength? And I think with what you're saying, with PTSD, it kind of gives you this awareness. You are able to understand your emotions and connect with other people who are probably going through similar things. So it's like, well, you said, you know, we kind of have a choice of how we choose to use our experiences. Yeah, no, hundred percent. So if I don't, if you don't mind me asking a personal question now, of course. So obviously a horrible experience. It could have killed you, it could have done any number of horrible, horrible things to you. How did you get past the PTSDS so that you can you can live up to your potential, live your dream, control your destiny? How did you go through that process? I mean what happened? I was very young, I was still at school in second over school in the UK and I had to have like, you know, bet time our fart to have like theraphy, and my mom, my mom's qualified, qualified focus. You Got Masters and humanistic counseling and such, hypnophopy, but my mom helped me with hypnotherapy, wow, which help me help, yeah, help me to relax. So she was training at the time, so she kind of kept the grounded. And then I had to you know, I think it was comes I could luck a governing body came in, so I took sessions with them. So, yeah, I think just talking about it really helped me to be honest and understanding it and kind of not fighting it, because I think I used to always think, you know, why is this happened to me? Why? Right, I would get frustrated and angry, which then probably made it worse. So I felt like a big to my think for a while. You know, I didn't like what was happening, but it kind of dissipated over time. It's quite strange really where they don't I don't really get. I don't suffer from, you know, anxiety or like depression anymore. You know, like I said, I can, I can, I can wear myself into an ancious state like I did a week because of this covid fission. But I think, you know, just talking about it really help. So let me ask you. You were young when this happened. What perspective that, yeah, do you have that other people who haven't had a brush with their own mortality, especially at such an early age? What perspective that? Do you have that others who haven't experienced the shot? Yeah, what is that have on what I I'd say if made me very empathetic. Now I'm quite tuned into people anyway, but it's quite you know, it's made me quite empathetic. It's made me very grateful for my life, for the things I have and for being alive, and I think like I made me more, you know, more understanding of people, because I think when it happened I was going through a phase where I was quite, what's the word rebellious? You know, I was in the wrong crowd of people. You know, I was more fueled by my ego and when that happened, that kind of, you know, shattered. So I think, you know, it's maybe more imperfit, more grateful, more we're in some way. You know, it's I can kind of tune into people, connect with people, and I've kind of been able to connect to myself on the deeper I think. Yeah, and tuning w tuning into people as kind of a double edged sword, isn't it? Yeah, because I think when it was happening, you know, with anxiety your awareness is on like a different level, on a different frequency. It's a bit like a radio antenna and I was shunting it. You know, I picking up on emotions,...

...my own emotions, people. Was it was just a bit of an Overwhelmedna and I kind of sold up as a hinderance, but I didn't like it. So lucky, you know, it's kind of using it to you advantage in some ways, kind of scene as a gift, but it's kind of made me more grateful. You know, the person that's kind of like all one and one. Yeah, and that's kind of like all the superhero movies right. So they almost all of them have some point where the superhero is in crisis mode over their abilities and their their question. Why do I have this? Why? Why me? Right, even though everybody in the audience is saying, are you kidding? This is amazing and and it's kind of the same thing when you're able to tune in and be empathic and really help a lot of people, but it's also if you don't have a good sense of who you are, then you can get lost in the other person and then it can be just this huge burden. But I you know, it's like everything. It's it's two sides of a coin. What side are you going to focus on? You know, crisis, they've said, which apparently isn't entirely accurate, but they said that the Chinese character for crisis, one side is danger and one side's opportunity, and I guess that's not technically correct when you go back and look at the language, but it's a good illustration of yes, there's danger with Covid yes there's danger with heights, yes there's danger with all these things, but there's also this just an amazing opportunity that can be had and I think for everybody listening to this. Listen, if you're fearful, have enough fear to that it inspires you to become healthy. Most of us, you know, we're in social isolation in the states and I believe in UK you are as well, and so, I think every place but Belarus, actually, which Belarus, I think, is drinking vodka and and going to it's on that. I hope that works out for them. But most of the planet has this amazing opportunity right now to take an honest look at themselves and ask them okay, do I really need these cigarettes? Do I really need the donuts? How about I just start eating some fruits and veggies and working out a little bit? And we no longer have the excuse of Hey, I'm in two hours in traffic every day or I'm stressed from work or on whatever. People have no excuses now. So if people are not willing to take care of themselves now, when they have no excuses, even if you don't have a gym membership and you can't go to the gym, you can still go for a run jog, you can do burpees, you can you can certainly eat your fruits and veggies. If you aren't taking advantage that. Now, if you're just looking at the doom and gloom and going about the sedentary lifestyles and the too much alcohol and smoking in all that stuff, then you have to ask yourself what underlying mental health condition do you have? Because that's what it boils down to. It's it is you allowing a mental health condition to allow yourself to be unhealthy. And I know it's kind of brutal for people, but that's your only option. You don't have any more excuses. If you want to be part of the solution, if you want to do your part, take this time to get rid of the bad habits and watch your life just become everything you've wanted it to be. And it only takes two or three weeks to change a habit, so so change it. You know, it's interesting we talked about alcohol because I know a lot of people have turned to alcohol on this board. In fact, I was at a costco and I don't I don't think you have them over there. We we have them in selected Paul solved the country. There isn't. There's any. Okay, we're all. I am. Well, you know, it's a Putty, huge, huge warehouse. Of bulk supply of food and clothes and that sort of stuff. and The lady behind me had her entire shopping cart filled with wine and a bag of doritos. I mean this was a couple weeks ago, but that was her preparation for food supplies. You know, there were no rice or beans or any sort of substantive food I would not call Dorito's food. And and I was just thinking. You know, alcoholics and people who consume too much alcohol, they often are deficient in zinc, and zinc's one of the main things that we need for our immune system to be healthy, and we know that, or seemed we think. We know that taking a little bit of zinc supplementation every day can help fight the COVID virus. Now don't do too much zink because it will deplete your copper stores and you need copper as well. So don't overdose on it. And I know there's debate on this, but I personally take a zinc with copper. But here you are. You're going home, you're not getting good nutrition because you're just consuming your calories with alcohol. You're depleting the zinc. It's contributing to leaky gut which you know doesn't matter, even if you're consuming healthful food, your your gut can't really take the nutrients out to support you. And it's like why, why don't we just spend...

...the two weeks and focus on, I'm, actually making ourselves healthy, i. What do we have to lose? And yet so many people are listening to this right now and and they just they'll refuse to do it. They'd rather sit and watch the news and be full of fear. No, suckly, I think, like what you said, with people buying alcohol and Shitty food, so to speak. Like I know it's on the supermarket downhill. A lot of people buying, you know, fulk boxes of like kinds of Laga fail and crisps and yeah, just you think your self lot. You know, there's so many good, cheap alternatives for a lot good food, fruit, vegetables, but not too expensive. When you win out about it, it's the process foods that are expensive. You know, people say eating healthies expensive. No, no, it's not. By a big bag of carrots, bunch of spinach, and you know, you can literally have ten meals. You can spend in the US. I don't know what it would be over there. But you can. You can spend twenty dollars get ten or fifteen meals of really good food. Don't buy the salad dressing is premate. Get Big bottle of of extra virgin olive oil and some balsamic that'll last just six months to a year and make your salad dressing and don't have all the preservatives in the junk in it. So they did a study last year and you know all studies have flaws, but this one is fairly instructive and it said of people consume more than for ultra process foods a day, that they're chances of dying from all causes go up sixty two percent and for every in certain one serving more, the chance goes up by eighteen percent. So five servings is now eighty percent chance of dying. Increased chance of dying from all causes. Now ultra process foods are basically all of your cereals, all of your hot dogs, all of your crackers, all of your Soda Pops, all of your sports nutrition drinks, all of that stuff. And if if you look at especially in America, I think you all are a little better over there, but not much. The vast majority of what people consume are ultra processed foods, and these companies that make the ultra process food us, they have whole teams of scientists and their soul job is not to provide the best nutrition. Their soul job is to make these foods as psychologically and biologically addictive as possible. They even put additives in there so that it helps shut down the mechanism by which our body tells us were full. So it helps shut those down, chemically shut those down. So you eat the whole box of chips, or crisp as you call them. You eat the whole box of something else instead of stopping. So you know, most you eat French fries. Most servings of French fries that you get at a restaurant are at least two servings, because that's one servings about ten to fifteen fries, and so you're doing at least two, sometimes three, servings right then and there. And and that's the expensive stuff. I mean the cheap stuff is the stuff that came out of the ground that didn't need to be processed. You just throw in a container and ship it off to the local market. That's quite crazy when you think about isn't it? How these companies are allowed to do that and get away. Oh yeah, people keep on buying these puddals. I mean it's an addiction, isn't I mean everyone likes their own thing, like my thing bouting. I like chocolate, you know, I bought some chocolate yesterday, but you know, I try and limit you know, a large bar and I'm like chaos Medune. It's about balances in it as well, I think. But like to welcome by chemical that they put in food that makes a lot more addictive. I'll find the pringles up both rangles ones often that a lack whole te with it within the day and I was like the it is so nice, I just want to more. It was lot some Pauma. Subconscious was just telling me to cut out of it too. Yeah, so part of that is the crunch factor. So the more crunchy a substances, and they know exactly how crunchy it should be and shouldn't be, that triggers parts of your brain to release dopamine. Part of it is the high fruit, just corn syrup and the salts and the bad fats, right. So they have the formulas, they put them together. So I asked this question. You know in the book I wrote. One of the chapter starts with, you know, what is the most consumed drug on the planet, and I give some options, you know, like mind altering substances, to include alcohol and legal illegal pharmaceuticals. You know, antidepressants, anti pain. So your as spirings, your emotrens, your hyperprofens,...

...that sort of thing. So and at the end of it the answer e is the correct one, of other and it's food. So definition of a drug, and I just pulled it up on the Internet so I can actually read it, it's a medicine or other substance which has a physiological effect when ingested or otherwise introduced into the body. Well, we know that we feel vastly different when we have a donut versus if we have a salad. And food is absolutely the most common consumed drug on the planet and we don't think of it that way. But if I want to think of food as Hey, I want to feel happy and full of energy today, I'm pretty sure I do not pick up the bag of crisp. I'm pretty sure I pick up a nice spinach salad like we all know this and it's what we spoke about earlier. Just a little bit of intention. Do you care enough about yourself and do you care enough about the loved ones around you and you care enough for this planet that you're on to be the best you that you can be? And if so, why don't we start consuming the drugs that will support us with that? And the drugs that will support us with that are our fresh fruits and veggies. All right, it's not PROZAC, it's not, you know, any illegal substance. It's not alcohol, it's a depressant, it's not crisp, it's not you know, and and we just we need to think of everything that we're consuming as a drug. Now, like you said, have a little chocolate every once in a while, have a little treat. We need to find joy, we need to have that moment of release. But if it's five candy bars a day, that's a problem. And, and you know, none of these lessons are new. Moderation in all things. So, yeah, I completely agree with what you've just been saying about about, you know, diet and nutrition and eaten the WH things. Like you know, I'm multivitamins as well. Like I went to this local supermarket, I bought a pack of sixty tablet moltivitamins, which got on and as well, about eightpence, if not even, not even like equivalent to a dollar, and you know that's would you say? Will you say lot vitamin's health? But multip know, I think there's a ton of debate on them. I take some multi vitamins. I've even created my own supplement to help people have healthy skin and you know, I take them. I think a lot of the ingredients and multi vitamins are well, they probably just make your year and more expensive and colorful. But I do think that there are number first of all, I think the best way to consume your vitamins and minerals are through fresh fruits and Veggies, whole foods. I think how how they were made is is in the right concentration to nourish our bodies. But I do think that with farming practices and with how we've kind of been raping and pillaging our planet, that our fruits and veggies are not as nutrient dense as they were a hundred years ago and I think a hundred years from now they're going to be even less nutrient dense. So I do think multi, multi vitamins are a decent thing, even though they haven't a lot of them haven't really been scientifically proven to do much. But I take some and, like I said, I created my own supplement to help people have healthy skin and I'm a dermatologist now. And so yeah, it's kind of a hard question to answer because I think a lot of what's in them maybe not. I think they're we're getting more and more data on it and I think that this whole concept of what nutrients and what foods we need to eat based off of our individual genetic code, and what actual pharmaceuticals we should be consuming and what concentration based off of our genetic code, I think that whole topic is going to explode over, you know, the next five to ten years, and I think five to ten years from now we'll be able to do a blood test, look up our genetic code and say, okay, these are the vitamins and minerals I really need, these are the foods that really support my my whole body. And you know, because there's all this debate about Paleo or Kido or vegetarian or, oh my gosh, it's exhausting to just try to wrap your mind around. At our grains good are they bad? Or legooms good, or are they bad? And I think the answer is that we don't really know and I think it's more of an individual recommendation. We don't really know how to do that yet, but I think there's some constants. I pretty sure nobody's genetic code wants them to have donuts. I think nobody's genetic code wants them to have French fries or Fried Chicken or fried ice cream or you know. I I think that we can have some common sense while we're still waiting for the technology to give us more detailed individual information. Not Exactly. I think, like you know, stead of...

...going for the easy option where you can just buy something in front the open, you know, go out your own way to spend life. Said, like you said, you prepare your males, takes five minutes and you had your whole week. You know, when you thought do that more instead of, you know, sabotage myselves and be more big built, a bit more mindful of actually thinking what we eat and how much water we drink. I mean I drink a ton of wall and water. Is Meant to be, you know, really yet skin? Oh Yeah, hundred percent, listening. Skins. The biggest organ in your body and so if you're constantly dehydrated, it's going to show everywhere, from your thought process to your skin from the inside out. So you know, it's a mind, body spirit connection. And so yeah, I have a friend who was morbidly, morbidly obese and he was at least two hundred fifty pounds overweight and all he did was put down the cheese, stop eating cheese and stop drinking soda pop and he lost over a hundred pounds in a year just by this, stop drinking the soda, the Colas and the cheese. And it's interesting when you think about it from an addictive perspective. All that sugar right, it creates a high. You know, your neurotransmitters in your brain creates a little high. Well, she's does as well. There's a protein in milk products called casing, and casing when you ingest it and it goes into your belly and the acids interact with it, it turns into Kazo, morphine or the last yeah, so morphine, case on morphine. So it gives you a very small hit of basically taking some heroine. At least it interacts with the brain and much the same way now. Obviously it's super, super small. But why in the world do we crave cheese when it smells horrible and rotten and it kind of is a rotten food? It's because we're we're getting small hits of Morphine. And if we actually look at what we what we consume and ask, Huh, I really wonder if this is what my body needs, I don't. I don't really think you need a PhD behind your name or study nutrition your entire life. I think we have the common sense and if we don't, our grandparents sure do. Ask them and they'll tell you. HMM, yeah, Tom's definitely changed. Probably from a WAG grandparents. You stop to eat in walls around many years ago. Probably wasn't a law. Foods die, you know, not being made and you can put some stool by. I did see that. I did see that on the news, on the Internet somewhere about cheese. That is not the same effect before her all the same, least in this crazy but when you put into terms, lot I love in the UK we have cheese on topes, so it's like, you know, Moto Cheese on toast, and so it just tastes so nice. So it's it's, like you said, it's that you getting those hits on it was small hits of that same effect. Take Prebaby, taken Hoan. Yeah, I mean it's minuscule compared to taking Haro and I mean it's, you know, one ten of one percent or something crazy like that, but it's still the point. The point is that we do not eat. I think all of us know this intuitively. We do not eat what we eat because it's the healthiest option. We eat what we eat because it makes us feel a certain way. Well, you know, that's that's great. But if we just change how we eat for two weeks, see our bacteria in our gut, right, our bacteria has more to do with what we crave food wise then what our bodies want. Otherwise we'd be eating Broccoli and cauliflower and carrots all day long. So our bacteria, it feeds off of certain foods and then it tells our brain what we crave and then we eat that to feed the bacteria in our guts. And we've established this. I mean they're calling the gut the second brain now and actually has more on neurotransmitters, more of the SARATONINS and dopamines and stuff than our brain does, and so it only takes about two weeks to really shift the natural gut bacteria in our stomachs to something that's healthy. If you just spend two weeks consuming nothing but fruits and veggies and good for you stuff, your entire gut flora will be different at the end of those two weeks and you you'll notice that you don't crave the crisp or the bread with the cheese on it anymore, because the bacteria have that crave, that that feed off of that. They're starved, and the bacteria that don't want that stuff, IE, they want the Broccoli and the cauliflowers. They're going to be abundant your belly and you're actually going to start craving those. So I had an interesting moment this weekend where I worked...

...out really hard, and I love working out hard because I like my workouts to be my drug. I like that to affect my mood, not not something that I'm consuming and unless it's healthy foods. But so I worked out super hard and I probably pushed it too hard. You know, after a really hard run or sprint or or you're doing those miserable suicides that they do in basketball gyms. I don't know if you guys do those over there, but basically run till you you throw up and and my body was just it felt down. I worked out too hard and I crave. For the first time in years, I craved a Diet Pepsi, as I used to that poison years ago, and that was a really instructive moment from me, because then I just stopped and I said, okay, okay, what emotional need is not being met right now, and I just sat there with the thought for a few minutes. That's how I got over my PTSD, by the way, too, is every time I relived the PTSD, I forced myself to think about it and be in that moment. And so I was sat down. I said, okay, why do I crave poison right now? And I remember back at it in time years ago when I was feeling run down and tired. That would be my go too, and I'd also dated a girl back then who loved Diapepsi and I found solace when I was around her. As soon as I recognize that, I didn't want to diapeps anymore. I just wanted to take a shower and have a healthful meal and everything was fine. So it really is our emotions when we crave the junk food. Man, we have so many windows into our soul right now that we can actually we can spend a decade of therapy on ourselves just by paying attention to what our bodies are telling us and what they're craving. Do that, man, where will we be at the end of this social isolation? We might actually our lives. So, for those are people out there who have PTSD, like you and I, most people do not remember the traumatic event. It's not a memory thing, it's we relive it in our bodies. And so that's why people with PTSD all of a sudden react and they lash out because because their body is viscerally feeling the event, because the brain isn't pnocesstin yet. So what the brain does is they say this event was so outside of normal and so traumatic that I can't put it in its proper box and label it and Tuck it away and assimilate it into the personality and to our subconscious. So it makes the body relive the experience. Your heart rate goes up, your breathings different, you start sweating and you start being hyper vigilant physically. So our body does that so that we can try to make it make sense. So how I got over my PTSD was when I started experiencing those the conventional wisdom was to just shove it down, don't think about it, look away like whatever. That's all nonsense. I knew that in order to get over it, I'd have to stare it in the face, eye to eye, and I'd have to relive that experience. And while I was reliving the experience, back in America, safe America, I then forced my brain to logically look around and say what I had but I had to go there first, I had to allow my body to be back in a rack and then I had to logically see where I was right now and it. You know, the first time I did it it probably took me an hour and it was painful, man, I was painful. But now I can do it in about half a second because I've just over the years, over the last ten years, I've just learned to say, okay, slamming percussive door, it's not a RAC it's not a bomb, it's not a whatever, and I'm I am immediately, within half a second, a second, I'm back in America, safe and sound and my body isn't reliving it anymore and I can smile because I overcame. HMM, yeah, no, exactly, and like you can't you know, history's good that you've been able to do it in that way. You know, it's kind of face it, hit on and kind of able to russianize situation and where you will. You're not, kind of take it. Takes a lot of shrims do, isn't it? Sing it's be able to do that, face it, and I don't know if it takes strength. I think it just takes being fed up. I just was not happy with the life I was living. You know, prior to Iraq I had just this vibrant, full, eclectic life. Was a life I wanted. It was the life of my choosing. After Iraq, I kept renting space. You know, Tony Robins says this. He's why would you rent space in your mind any longer to something so traumatic and negative? And he's a hundred percent right. Why would I allowing space to be rented in my mind of something horrible? Why don't you fill it with something that is of you're choosing so that you're not a victim. And as soon as I just got mad, mad that I was being a victim to these things. And you know, especially seven, eight years after...

...that, almost every cell in my body is different than it was in a Rac. So if I want to keep carrying around these emotional injuries, that's now of my choosing. All the cells are different, my whole body has been changed over enough. This is now of my choosing and if it's going to be of my choosing, my life's going to be on my terms, not something that happened a decade ago. That's that's ridiculous, HMM. And it's crazy that people lived the laws are well continuously Tuck a victim of the circumstances and point in the finger and blaming their situation on someone else. And you could have take responsibility for you life. I haven't. You you got you know what we so earlier. You have to be responsible for your situation. The food you we you know your help, you know you're responsible. You're in full control of them. It's just flipping on switch. And it's a lot with how we talk to ourselves too. So a lot of times we speak to ourselves and ways that we would never speak to anybody else on the planet of you know, you drop something and you call yourself a clumsy need fill in the blank. You do something innocent and you say, are you idiot? You, I mean man, how we to walk to ourselves? That needs to change. That's the first thing. If you're constantly calling yourself lazy, clumsy and idiot, fill in the blank. Well, how do you think your life is going to go now? If we do something wrong and bad, we could have done better. I do think it's important to take an honest look at that and have that be what it is. But I also think it's equally important that we do something well, do something magnanimous, do something right, that we also congratulate ourselves, as if all we're doing is negative self talk, what you focus on will grow. And if you're just constantly negative talking to yourself over silly things like dropping the toothbrush, wow, how is your life going to be any different than negative and condescending? And how are you going to talk to other people, because that's how you talk to yourself all day long? You might not call them an idiot, but you're thinking it and they can sure feel it an impath like you, hey, you can sure feel it when somebody thinks they're an idiot, regardless of the words that are coming out of their mouth. So right, yeah, yeah, it's it's crazy that we have ever been within us, but we don't know how to each some people, you know, don't know how to use almost quit. It's not something that's tought towards as an education school. We have to figure it out ourselves. But it's something so simple yet so hard, because some people is groups. It's the hardest thing to realize that you're in control your destiny. A lot of us want to point to something that happened ten, twenty, forty years ago and say this is why we are how we are. That's nonsense. All that is is giving you a scapegoat to not living up to your potential. I you know, it seems like so many of us, and I played into this for a while in my life too, but so many of us are caught in the game of I'm not in control of my destiny and because this happened to me, therefore gives me the excuse not to do that. And I think we're all scared of what we could achieve in life. So we find excuses to never get there. As the worst thing ever. It's the worst thing ever. I think that as well, and I think like I've I've been guilty of this, like with this podcast. Saw, I think I saw it months ago. I wanted to do it some time last year and I kind of convinced myself told myself out of it because I was worried about what other people think. So I mean, even before we try things, voice in your head, if you're not in control of it, can kind of talk you out. You can talk yourself about doing something before you even done it. And tell me what, what amazing things have you learned by doing this podcast, or how has it changed your life, because I imagine it's changed almost everything. Yeah, I mean I I love connect some of people. I'm I'm an extra burn. I'm energized by a talking to people, being around people, but I think like it makes me, you know, I'm very makes me humble, makes me very humble, very grateful, and it makes me see things from my finger different perspective, because you know, like you know the things that you've experienced and been through and you know the experience that you have, you know it. It kind of makes you, yeah, very what's the word? It makes me very appreciative of people, you know, if how amazing we are as as human beings and that we're...

...all different and that we all come from a different place and that we, you know, we come really, you know, make our lives wherever we wish for it to be, you know, regardless of what we've been from, and that's like the kind of the amazing thing about being human, isn't it? We adapt. That's what I've learned, that's what I've taken from it. You know, meeting different people here and their stories, the things that they faced and, you know, some of the I've never been in a Warz like you know. You've been in a rack in arts, you know, big leap jump and amazing thing to do. So it kind of makes meet one makes me want to be better as a person because there might be certain fears are I've got or, you know, like you see someone who's been through something much worse than your self. Oh and they've come from it's huge. It's huge. It's just all. It's the story we tell ourselves every day. It's how we talk to ourselves. Are we worth living our potential? Are we worth striving and becoming? Do we want to be different than we were ten years ago? It's all our choice. Yeah, HMM, but it's like a ice. Like Tony Weapons on, I've read a few of US books and I like his his documented on that flats and he think one of his quotes was like we go bought like a blueprint, you know, we have an excuse as to why things all the way they all. Yeah, yeah, it's if you understand your why. You know, Tony Simon Sense, if you understand why you're doing what you're doing, then it gives you the ability to change if you want to. But and again, now such a great time. So if we start feeling ourselves fear mongering or or whatever, that is not a helpful constructive emotion during this time that that inspires us to be part of the solution. If anything, that in our lives. That doesn't inspire us to be part of the solution. That's our key to ask what is that feeding in us? What is the need that that is meeting? Why do it? Why am I going for the Crisp Right now? What am I anxious about or nervous about or unfulfilled with. Just understand why you're doing what you're doing. If you understand it and you still want to go for the crisps, go for it, but at least you're aware, at least you're not blissfully diving into that that deep, never ending pool of disease and death. HMM. That's and it's like it has more of a better impact on your health and your mental health, to you know, your physical, emotional and your mental health. And it's like if you are eating something that's bad for you, you, I think, you kind of feel bad because you've done eaten that thing that you know isn't good for you and it kind of knocks you back a little bit. So if you can kind of, you know, eat a bit healthy, you know, even if you start with an apple or open honor, it kind of builds that momentum, doesn't it, I suppose, and you then want to eat something else that's healthy, like a salad, and then a salad to something else. I mean, I've my family, like my mom and my brothers, their vegetarians and like Vegan, whereas you know, I meet but I've noticed, you know, I felt very different in a positive way since living with my family you know, not eating as much, me having, you know, lent tools, vegetables show yeah, and I don't. I don't think there's anything wrong with eating meat. I think that a lot of us need meat to survive on. I prefer to eat the meat that is humanely raised and humanely killed and, by the way, it's much healthier and tastier. But yeah, I don't. I don't think there's anything wrong that. Night. I think that eating a banana, I think that that can go two ways. If you eat the banana and celebrate that you made a good health choice, then that will encourage you to make more. If you eat the banana and think this sucks, I'd rather have a donut, then it's probably is encouraging the doughnut more because you've assigned pain to that banana instead of it assigning pleasure. So yeah, I really think it is our mindset, how we approach anything. To see it kind of like going to the party. Are you going to go to the Party and say this is going to suck and then it's going to suck, I promise you, or you going to go to the party see this is going to be amazing and then of being amazing or much, much greater. It's that little attraction,...

...isn't it? It's not. You know what you could try right so that? Well, it's the same thing. Like you buy a new auto, right by a new car. All of a sudden you see that car everywhere. Well, man, before you pop the car, you never noticed it. Where you can you get a new watch or whatever it is, new haircut, and then all a sudden everybody has that haircut. So you know the law of attraction. I think people take it a little bit too far, but what you focus on will grow, and that's that's just evidence and everything. So if you focus on the good, on your potential, on overcoming and striving and helping, and that's where your life will take you. There's just no I fans or butts about it. MMM, you know, it would Mandela, Nelson Mandela, when he got out of prison, the guys one of my heroes, and he got out of prison to someone else. Aren't you wrong for losing all these decades of your life for, you know, really no reason? He said. Why would I be mad about that? It was. It gave me all this time to prepare to change the world. Wow, I've never been to an African prison, but I'm sure it's not club Med and he was able to sit there and say, Hey, I could look at all the bad, I could be bitter, or I could look at the good and I could do something about it. And you know, sometimes we can't change our external circumstances, and that's that's very true, but we can sure have domain over what our psyche does with it. And does it does it put us into the ground, six feet under, or does it elevate us and help us to achieve everything we've ever wanted? HMM, now, city's definitely true and he's such an inspirational person. Wasn't a light. I like that quote on your linkedin headline where says be the change we see in the world. And I've got a journal which is a new someone deal a quote on it and it says it always sees seems impossible until it's done. I think it's one day. I was Mendo, but that's why I think it's important, importing, isn't it, to have like role models and mentors, because you're not motivation, while he would you say your mentors or a lot, I mean romdnt ether quote you just said, Mandela Martin Luther King Jr, Eleanor Roosevelt, Oprah. I mean there's so many people who have just overcome and and made just enormous difference on this planet. And, yeah, having role models. Now, I think comparing myself to any of those people I just mentioned, I think a comparison would just wind me up into the ground right because why? I haven't I but they have. But I think focusing on what they've done and appreciating it and the human spirit that is behind that, that indomitable human spirit, focusing on that, I think that will elevate you higher then than perhaps anything else. I don't compare and beat yourself up. You know, comparing myself musically to Mozart probably is not going to win any any anything good for me. But celebrating his ability and knowing that somewhere in me there is some musical ability and the ability to make people appreciate the finer arts for generations, I think. I think that's amazing. So comparison maybe not. But but focus what you focus on gross you focus on amazing people, you focus on the horrible people on throughout history as well. You're liable to look at everybody else as being a horrible person. I'm not sure what that gains you. So not really careful what space we rent in our minds to what? We have to be aware, we have to be knowledgeable, but we have to be really careful. You know, my father always told me who you surround yourself buys who you will become. It's very true. So be careful what you're renting, what space you're renting in your mind. M I'll completely it's like you'll vibe the charactual tribe, doesn't it? And you know, you become, like you said, people surround yourself or you know, with in as being being conscious about your time and your energies in it, and we'll let you give out when you get up. It's everything by it's definitely you know, it's definitely important. told why wasn't to think about I think you know, people don't think about it. You know sometimes I think when thinking about it, when we we get to Sera in place, we kind of fool drained or negative. Then you kind of stall thinking about it. But you...

...shouldn't have to get to that place too. Then kind of does it's not thinking about it that makes sense. Say like what this is to do it all the covid on team. Would you come on talking about that? Is Okay, sure, after question and the area. I mean there's a lot of people out there who toldout masques and gloves and things like that. They would you say the effective? Well, it will nonsense. So I think that masks, obviously the n ninety five and those sorts of things, are the most effective. I think gloves can be utilized, especially for healthcare workers. I think most of us need to practice social first of all. I don't know what it's like over there, but over here you can't really get master gloves anymore. They're all being inappropriately so funnel to the hospital. So I don't know if you can even get these things right now. But I think practicing social distancing of at least six feet, washing your hands, not touching your face, I think those are those are probably the best that people can do. I think even the bad mass help a little bit, but you know, even some of the homemade masks can help all the little bit more than than having nothing at all. But if you're it's kind of like putting a bunch of sunscreen on and then laying out in the sun for eight hours a day, saying you're protected that. That doesn't really work right. It's kind of like taking a motion before you go on and all night bender saying I'm not going to get a hangover because I took an aspirin or something. It doesn't really work. So, yeah, I think the social distancing and the washing of the hands and all that stuff, I think that's what we need to be focusing on and not cheating, not saying Oh, it's my my mom or my dad, so it's okay, I can give him a hug. It's just one person, like, like, let's honor this. I think that's the best that we can do right now. HMM. Yeah, no, I could pretty agree and I think like it would just need to kind of take it serious and so much spa. I think there a lot of people out there who won't taking it serious. Like in the news I've seen a pull its, a lot of people ballbcubes, goops, a lot of twenty people and the police have from a lot of the spirits, like groups of people have ball the cues because but often you're always going to get on using to get that one two percent of people. Of course, there's always the social paths, right. So, and that's somewhere between one and three percent of the population or sociopaths. While you can't do anything about those, just like every profession, there's one percent that are that are really bad and that give up named everybody else. I don't know if we can, we should, focus on those is. I mean there's always going to be that, no matter what the topic is. There's always going to be the belar ruses who throw caution into the wind and and think the cure is is massive amounts of vodka and sawn us. So, but yeah, I think. I think when we do that, it's the starfish analogy. You know that, that story of a kid walking on the beach and picking up a star fish and throwing it into the ocean and there's thousand on the beach and Dad looks to the kid and says, Hey, you can't possibly make a difference, and the child wisely picks up another star fish and throws it back into the ocean. I said, but dad, I did to that one. And I think that's what we focus on here. Think we focus on what we can do, what how we can make a difference. And then and and by the way, that is not just social distancing that's everything we were speaking about in this podcast. Ask yourself why you're doing the unhealthy thing you're doing. What emotional need is that fulfilling? Why is your emotional home what it is? And if that's where you want to be the rest of your life, then keep doing what you're doing and if it's not, make a decision. Put put a line in the sand. Never again shall you cross it? HMM, and off day most train. It's definitely, definitely tree and I agree with that. And we luck, I think. Well, I been saying some people is, you know, this time, while we don't always get this much downtime and you know, six months or for months time, we need to kind of reflect, don't we, on the positive things that we did and, you know, the the way that we've kind of improved ourselves or helped others, because, like, I don't think we've got so much dwn time. And when am I happen again? So I think, you know, I've got opportunity now to create the things we want to create, you know, by that be podcast or YouTube channel or business or reading books. I think, because I've heard a lot of people saying, Oh, I'm bored and I'mline well, okay, why is it that so much too learned, so much to be if you're bored? Wow, it's yeah, I think as well, like there's there's so...

...many opportunities out there for as you know, especially with the Internet, that it can kind of be overwhelming some people. Probably there's too many things out there for us to do, that it's too much and people don't know where to start. But I mean for me, like, I don't know about you, but like writing, planning things. I've got like a journal and I'll plan things that I need to do or do like a gratitude list. What? What? What ways would kind of used to just ways that could help people, like, you know, the physical, emotional, like mentally. Just said it too. So again I before I get out of bed every morning, I forced myself to smile, because how our body reacts, our mind will follow. And then I think about how the day is going to go and how great it's going to be. That's before I get out of bed every day and then before I go to sleep every night, I forced myself to think about and, when I'm really diligent, actually write down three things I'm grateful for throughout the day, and it's been shown if you just write down three things you're grateful for, and don't just say I'm grateful for sunny weather, just write why I'm grateful for sunny weather, because it allows me to get out and exercise and and work and and clear my mind and it feels so good. You know that sort of thing. Give some descriptions. If you actually do that for five minutes for you go to bed, it's been shown that that is more effective at reducing the signs and symptoms of depression then Prozac or any of the pills that you can take those. If you actually force yourself to be grateful every night, within two to four weeks, your mood will improve your outlook on life. When improven it's free in the side effects are next to nothing. Right. So framing your day, if I if I could leave this podcast with with just one thing for people to do. Frame your day started in the morning, before you get out of bed, think about how great the day is going to be and how grateful you are. Force yourself to smile at the end of the day. Right down five minutes, right now. You can. You can shred it, burn it, eat it so nobody else sees it. If you're worried about that, but write down three things you're truly grateful for, and not just I'm grateful for family. Why are you grateful for family? And then go to sleep and watch how just that one thing starts to help you improve your life. Hm boss, really really helpful, really beneficial advice. NAIC's just crying. I think you know a lot of people listening to this, you know, will to hopefully take take some of them positive from this and apply, you know, these methods to the life, because it doesn't cost anything. It's well, the only thing I was lose a little bit of security. So when we when we constantly go back to the trauma that was twenty years ago, when we constantly go back to the negative self talk, when we constantly do that, we get some security from that because we know the outcome. The outcome is we feel horrible and we don't live our potential, and that's one of the basic human needs is to feel secure. So what you lose from this, what it does cost you, is it costs you some security, but what it gains you is the life that you've always wanted at the end of your life. It gained you a big smile on your face because you've lived it well. So, yeah, but everything else it's free. You know, the answer does not come in a pill at a doctor's office. Yeah, the book I that I wrote, the title is Universal Deathcare, a solution for healthcare in the age of entitlement, and I call it deathcare because that's what we focus on. We focus on disease and and death. We don't focus on prevention. And in the age of entitlement it it's because it's the great lie that we can we can abuse our bodies, our whole life and then go to the doctor and they'll give you a pill and instantly everything's going to be better at all. That pill were reverse seven, six, seven decades of poor choices. It's not true. So if you you will lose your security, your net, that security net, that you're a victim, that the world's against you, that whatever nonsense you've told yourself. But what you will gain is the life that you've always wanted. HMM, something it just goes to share. How was it real and how stronger we all the you know, and like through visualization and meditation and the benefits of that and Yogu and really trouting into a souls,...

...hundred percent, yes, but it changes in maze, isn't it? False? False, of those. Now this make do make me think, because make you really reflect and think about, you know, what, how you want your futures to be. You know, into plan and Tina, get get the ball rolling, you know, because we're not. We're not designed other whom we designed, always human beings just to glide true life where you know, we're designed, in it's Nys to create things and these selfable into strive and help of us. Yeah, I mean that much more. Actually made in the image of God. If there's people out there who believe that, if we're made in the image of God, God created the world. He's wanting us to create our world. He's given us that ability if you choose to use it. And if you don't believe in in religion, fine, believe in evolution, survival of the fittest. So if you're going to evolve, which we all can, we all know evolved to something of your choosing. So doesn't matter if you're religious or if your scientist or whatever you are, whatever you believe either. Philosophy at the foundation of it is create, evolved, become don't just sit there and be blown by the wind. Yeah, because you know, I having that pret as well. If not taking those opportunities, I think that's one of the worst things, isn't it like having mcgrat and having night emotion in your body? It's not one of the best things. You want to call out. Look at the things that you have done, the things you have achieved in the people you have helped, and it's about giving them back, isn't it about giving back, making a difference, and we're absolutely I think that's no better way to end this podcast than what you just said as brilliant. Pretty appreciate you being on the podcast. I go by anything. gapers call me right. You can wait the expresident. Yeah, now, I'm very appreciative of your time, your energy and in coming on the pot times. Very really monit. I'm grateful day and I think it's nighttime. They're so have fun writing your three things of gratitude down and cheers, mate. I really appreciate the time. Take care. Yeah, thank you writing. Take care. Say So.

In-Stream Audio Search

NEW

Search across all episodes within this podcast

Episodes (102)