Sounder SIGN UP FOR FREE
The Parrsitivity Podcast
The Parrsitivity Podcast

Episode 37 · 1 year ago

The Parrsitivity Podcast #Episode 65 Magus D. Spamer

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

In this episode I'm joined with Magnus D. Spamer, Magnus is a counselor, Lifecoach, mental health advocate. In this episode we talk about mental health, coaching and much more! --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/the-parrsitivity-podcast/message

Hither. My name is Adam Po and the podcast host posity to podcast. In this podcast, you will be listening to me connect with people from different walks of life, from the military to people in the music industry, to people in the SELFHELP industry and many other areas of life. In this podcast I'll be talking about topics from self help, mental health, motivation, spirituality, mindset, society, current affairs and much, much more. If you enjoy this podcast, please subscribe, share and let me know your feedback. And my main intention on this podcast is to have a positive impact for you, the lit the listener, to take something positive from it, to apply something positive into your life from this. Now with without further ado, let's go to podcast and enjoy high welcome to polse did your podcast. In today's episode it I'm with magness D spamer. He's a mental health outcook, a personal development guide, social psychology, Student Life Coach and counselor. magness helps coach people to be the best version of themselves and live their best life. In today's Episode We Talk About coaching, happiness, mental health and much, much more. Now, sit back, relax and enjoy this episode. Him, Gonsie, doing your I I'm very good yourself, Adam, how are you good? Good, goods, yeah, I'm great. Shows laughing of angs. Perfect. Can you hear me? Okay, yeah, perfect, not awesome. Yeah, now, thank you for coming on. The podcast. Very really appreciates it. Big Pleasure with pleasure now. You Welcome. So I'll just just want that, like what stuff by you know, asking you, you know how you got into it, our what you do? Go on. Your profile says you like coach and you're in my personal development. Yes, yeah, well, look, studied that and I've been working towards that. That's constant. That's why I've I've decided to take up social psychology studies as well. I think you would see that there. So that's all in the light of actually also becoming working towards project management, and that's where we could also make a big change, I think. And yourself random. What made you, let's say this is what made you start a podcast? What is your motivation behind this? Yeah, no, I I kind of started because, you know, I'm quite, yea quite. I'm quite tuned into people. I'm people person. You know, I qualified as a live coach as well, and I like connecting with people and I thought to...

...myself, you know, why not do a podcast and connect to people and see why, you know, see what they do what they do, because I think that we've will, we've all got our own story, will go around background and we've all got our reasons for what we do, why we do it. Now almost I think if we, you know, if I could make some of them where I can great content for people to take some of a positive from it. And Yeah, I just kind of went from there. I didn't really think it would kind of pick up when I first started it, but I just hadn't, let you know, an idea and I just kind of executed on it really, but I did watch, I have to say, I did watch the video of you talking about idea execution and I really enjoyed that. That's something that that I found quite informative and obviously motivational, and I wanted to ask you. I didn't want to ask you there because I knew I was going to talk to you in first well on, yeah, of course, on the podcast, but have you ever thought of where ideas come from? It might sound like a quite a false fetched question, but there's a few realms of belief in the sense that there is a big pool of these ideas and if you are, let's say, aware enough, then you do receive some of them. What is your perception of way these ideas actually come from? Now, I appreciate you like in the video and watch the video really, but it means a lot, I think. I like I said, in terms of ideas and where they come from. It's almost, I'd say it's almost like part of like your consciousness and like your for processes. I think so. To me it's, you know, in my mind I'll be thinking about something and tuning into that and sometimes, you know, I could go for a walk or when I've got a bit of space or clarity, just kind of POPs into my head. The way. Yeah, it's interesting. But yeah, it's an interesting question because I think you know, like well, we're all we've all got our own minds and we've all got our own way of thinking. So a lot ideas are going to be different to each person. But where they actually come from, I think, is, you know, our for our probably our belief system or curiosity, and it's kind of all kind of forms together. I think. Well, I like when you said that it's a consciousness and that definitely is a consciousness. I mean we live in one global consciousness. So the thought behind that, I mean there's there's a lot of scientists that actually said as well that most of the breakthrough moments came when they had their most like you said as well, the moments of clarity that were walking in nature, they didn't have too much on their mind and boom the idea came to them or they came upon the idea or howevery one. MM. Yeah, it's I think it's definitely fascinating. I think, like you know, we are fascinating as people and I think like in terms of ideas and having that clergy, like you said, I think with the lockdown and the current situation, I think people are probably got it's some circumstances more clavity because they they're not surrounded by certain things that are going on. They're not going to work, public transport or however they get to work, so there's not the usual rack race kind of thing. Yeah, yeah, there's like more focus on ourselves. I think that's very true. That's very true. Let's say this. If I can ask you how is this? Has This not impacted...

...you? I guess it has impacted everybody. But in what since of you you started the podcast? What? What? What other things have you ventured into that that you would like to yeah, she as well. Yeah, I think like since the lockdown. Mean I ended up basic becoming unemployed because the current situation. So I thought to myself, you know, I'd use my time been put in a productive way. Yeah, so I like I've I ventured into the podcasting, you know, I've been reading more. Yeah, just trying to get into, you know, reading more, just being, I think, you know, spend a more time with family and and just kind of x I think, you know, take an action action a lot more and not worried about what people think. You know, just kind of worked on myself a little bit. See, that's, I think, something I can take away from this, as well as just like not really caring too much about what I mean people could possibly think. I mean most from what I've seen on the Linkedin community, it's quite people are quite supportive, people are quite encouraging. So I mean, why not go for it? I hope that you have found it like that up until now. I don't know how things have been, how things have been going for you. HMM, yeah, not appreciate. I think, like you said, it's everyone kind of I think everyone does worry. I think everyone can worry about what people think. I think it's that it's not balance, isn't and how much you that to hold you back. I mean we, like said, Linkedin's quite a supportive community, is quite supportive platform, and I I've just kind of really honed in it. Honed in on it recently. I used to kind of put things on facebook, you know, when I was at school, you know, many years ago. Yeah, it wouldn't get much response and it wouldn't really probably got the likes. I wanted it to go. ENGAGEMENT, Yun engagement. Yeah, and I kind of was like thinking it defin really makes sense back then, whereas I think now it makes sense because you kind of find your tribe of people down as you go. Oh, that's the nice thing, especially with this it's that you can go into the fields and start talking to the people and the functions that they've got on there, especially with mentoring and whatever that might be. I mean if you do eat someone up and they like they said on their profile they would like to mentor someone else, think it's a windwin situation. So yeah, it's definitely a interesting platform to at least engage and learn from. I definitely think that let don't know, im sababout that problems the phone over here and know why? Always technical problems. Now we will always have that. Has Learn of problem. Yes, now, I don't know what was your last question I was I was saying about Linkedin and, like you know, kind of the engagement where, you know, years ago, post content and I wouldn't get the Yes, yes, kind of wanted words. I think like by...

...now kind of you know, kind of find your tribe of people, don't you? There are certain plot certain platforms. So I think linkedin has been quite quite effective and hard. But a lot of people are podcasts to you off Linkedin as well. So it's it's been quite good for me. It's if you find it good for yourself. Oh, definitely. I mean through Linkedin, I think there's a lot of if you see the professionals and how they engage and being able to mental with someone that you actually, let's say, really regard, that's I mean. Of Why wouldn't you do that, especially a most of the time it's encouraged that they do that. Obviously on a pro bono basis. So I mean you can get to pick these guys brains for next to nothing and I mean that's obviously something that I think is very useful and beneficial. HMM. Yeah, so exactly, and I think like it can open up a lot of opportunities concerts or you can meet so people who probably and the same kind of light by the work that you are. Are you are. You know what there's like. It's not what you know, it's who you know, right. Yeah, yeah, yes, that's a good what else is keeping you busy? Well, I think I've lost that. I've asked you. I would say I think was can be busy. You know, I've got I've got two dogs, so they they can be busy to walk the dogs and after them. Okay, you know, I think it editing. You know, editing podcasts, making the content for that and itself can take a long time. You know, the the artwork for the PODCASTS, posting it, you know, making sure it's laid out properly. So a lot of time goes into it and I think, you know, a lot of time go you know, goes into you know, this online course I'm doing. I've been doing like an course, an NLP? Okay, that's very, very interesting. I did and start with an NLP course myself as well. Yeah, CBT, cognitive be aviual therapy course. I don't you've most probably have heard of that as well. How do you finding it so far? Where did you start the course? So I can ask. Yeah, I did it. I've enrolled on a course online ground and it's got I think it's got around nine modules on it. So I found that and then I just kind of been doing a what I came really but it's very it's very deep and it's very there's a lot to it. So I have to I think we've NLP, you know, but kind of stuff it you have to kind of go over and just take your time with it. True, if you if you want to be effective, and I mean competent, that would be yes, obviously to immerse yourself in it as much as possible would be beneficial. Here, definitely. Did did you find the CBT in then I'll be like interesting, did you most definitely CBT and N LP. I mean I'm actually quite sure that those two should go hand in hand whenever someone is studying either or I mean I think it should be a prerequisite to have either or what either one of them. But definitely cognitive behavior therapy, just being able to help people to to change the way that they think. I mean, especially in light with all all of the things happening around the world now, the pandemic and George Floyd and all of that stuffness of behavioral therapy will be a definite a bonus in your in...

...your repertoire and the sense of being able to help people think just in a different way. You don't need to tell them you think, just being able to assist someone in getting a different point of view and actually being able to entertain someone else's without having to agree with it. I think that's where what it comes down to. Yeah, no, impletely agree. Like I think, like said, it really kind of hones in on how you think and what you think and ways, ways of responding to two situations and those other with. I don't know if you've come across in your inner piece so far as just you're like I think they called a mental speak of what you would say. Let's say something happens, if son over heats or you bump your toe, most people, well most of us, would reply idiot. And it's interesting to see how our psych are subconscious. It doesn't really have sarcastic filter in the sense that it doesn't discern between you are being sarcastic or you not. It just takes it in as Oh, you just told yourself you're an idiot, or whatever the too might be. Usually it's negative terms, and I don't know if you've come across that yet. I've come across like yeah, but I'm sure that's definitely on the I would like to think so that would be good. Yeah, I would be a good part of that, just to it's just to be good to be aware of it. It's just very good to be aware of it. Yeah, because, I you said, like you in Lucky, you know your mind, like you think something, like you know world like that. You're you know, you you what most believe. I don't know. It's, like you said, it's the word POPs up, you know. You know my hurt yourself, and then you kind of become what you're thinking. You kind of digest that true, true, and we don't want to execute that idea now. Yeah, yeah, and yeah, I think, like said, positive, positive thought. So you know much, much better and has a better, better impact than I negative ones. But I think like we're quite, you know, I almost wired to be negative. Is Quite, you know, easy. It's a lot easy to be negative, very much, very that's why the one thing that we find we are very much biased towards a negative and it's just because of years of well, it's conditioning as well. And and there's quite an interesting way or train of thought, especially in the social psychology field, of how we build and reconstruct memories. And the reason we are, you tend to be prone more towards the negative is because the negative seems to have a little bit more, a bigger impact on our memories. That's why negative events sometimes it gets it can create a traumatic experience in your life, obviously, and get remembered more vividly. So we do tend to lean more towards the negative. But again, with practice, like I think with anything in life, with practice you can you can work and improve that. Yeah, no, I definitely agree. Like it's definitely not flipping up perspective. Isn't. Definitely I think you can probably be a lucky, you know, a negative emotional stay and you can, you can watch some of them or somebody can say something. I feel that's not the quite powerful things that you know you can. You can flip your emotional stay within a couple of seconds just by, you know, reading some hearing something or watching something. Definitely, definitely, I don't know if there's at least method to the madness in...

...the sense for me in having a routine, there is some success in routine. I used to not really subscribe or like it too much, but they is definitely. It depends on what routine you set up as well. And I don't know if you familiar with Jordan Patson. Yeah, Jordan Peter say, he's really good, very, very, very well wine thinker, very open minded. Comes down to you just said like yeah, they setting up a skill, you've setting up a regiment. Don't be ad dictated about it. Just do it in the sense that you could also enjoy but still be successful and get those I like to call them double us. Get the double us during the that get those wins. HMM. Yeah, no, I can be a great like I think. I think he's a really good, good speaker as well. I think, you see, he's very what's the word? Now? I've want agrees what it says. I know he's quite controversial. Yeah, that I've heard that as well. I'm some of these ways a little bit, I guess, not on Bar with what the world wants. But there's a lot of good to take away from how he sees it in his studies that he's done. So I mean let's I think that all of us can decide. You can listen to it, you can take away the good and can leave the man. It's up to you. Yeah, I've listened to a lot of stuff. Is really good. I've got his book Autsu with I'm ready yet, but which show we look is that, if I can ask, cool twelve twelve wolves were also. Oh Yeah, very I mean that that's his kind of like conception on, you know, his ideas, of his rules. But like you listen to what you says some time there is is very clear. It's very real what he says and I think a lot of people don't like it, probably because it challenges almost their opinions, doesn't it? How they think and what they do? That is true. I mean we do get sometimes we get the defensive one. Now way of thinking gets challenged. Instead of trying to entertain the other person's idea, we try and defend ours and sometimes it's not always the best thing to defend it and just listen. Right. Yeah, Nice, that's something that I've you know, I've learned there is lie, you know, just listening more, not not reacting, and there's a differences in May between responding and reacting. Definitely. I mean by I've had to consciously remind myself sometimes, instead of listening to someone just so that you could reply to them, instead listening to what they actually have to say and and you don't have to internalize it, but you can interpret it in a way and see where they're coming from, because none of us are coming from the same perspective. It's impossible. We can try and enlighten the other person in the sense of where you coming from. So that's definitely plus and I think it great, great, I thought I teaching your in your toolbox to be able to listen. I we don't do that enough. Yeah, no, I completely agree, and I think, like you know, we've listening as well. You know, they were person, he was met people, person feels understood. You. You know, probably will have conversation with somebody where you're talking and then the other don't listen and then, especially in you know, workplaces, are being and you explaining something to somebody and they they don't. I mean,...

I've been there myself. I've been that person. That's why I can see it quite vividly. Like people still explain things to me when I was like never a teenager, and I would say yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah, but I was absolutely listening to it. Yeah, I'll taken what I wanted from it and then I would make mistakes. So you can see the way around. Could you kind of like push through that? Well, I mean it's it's handling to be able to admit that. Look, I suffered from that as well. I think some days I still do. I don't always actively listen to my best. Yeah, but that's very true. I mean just first being able to accept it and say, like this is yeah, I didn't listen there. At least you learned from those mistakes. That's I mean. I think then it's not such a bad thing. At least you learn from it. Yeah, yeah, well, I used to work in a lot of restaurants and hotel so I kin'd of I don't know. I think I reached the point where I made mistakes and I took foodthron table and I think like that I had to get. I had to reach a certain place of feeling shame, I think, because breaking point being a yeah, because you know, you fellow are you know I was letting the customer down and then the chefs happen to go with me and the people you work with and I think a certain way. So I think, yeah, that was the kind of like probably switching point really, but lucky star. Think it's difficult because we've all got our own habits and we've all got our own ways through. You know, sometimes I'm always mindful of I mean I probably have times when my mom, my mom, I told me to do something about yeah, I do really. Yeah, so that all of look, all of us. I don't think we anyone, anyone. I was perfect. It happens to the best, yes, but I think, as you said, the first step is just being able to to realize it, because then you can kind of catch yourself out when you do do it and and like refocus. HMM, no, I agree. Like those just thinking. Do you have any favorite books that you read at all? Any books are stand out to you? I've got I've actually started reading a lot of Bookowski and just to be able to choose the coow ski yeah, Charles Wick Awski. Yeah, because I found in the past as well I would commit a lot to, let's say, studying and then I would overwork myself and burn out because there's no real break from the actual, let's say, the course work or the the reading that needs to be done or some of the assignments that need to be done. So I started. I just I decided, listen, I'm going to start reading something that's way outside of my comfort zone and it's really interesting so far. The books called woman, I know if you ever get your hands on a Charles Wick Awski book, it is a very good read. Now sounds really good. I've never read any of his books, but very insight for seeing the model and you saw this a love so sorry, come on you and yourself to you as there any books that you would recommend? I often one of the first good books I've read was once heard of it that think and grow rich NA party. No, Oh yes, yeah, very, very good books like especially, especially it's starting out. That creates a good foundation. Yeah, I mean I've really enjoyed that. It's a reader a gnuch because it was a couple of years ago and over I read that. I like this philosopher called islands. Oh,...

...yeah, what's Yes, definitely, I've got a few of his audio books. Alan Watch is a very, very wide thinker as well. I like him a lot. Yeah, he was like ahead of his time, wasn't it? Like he is around the s or the S S. He was talking about society, people and what he was saying. I think it wasn't really happening then. The know, and I mean it just again, he was talking about things, as you said, ray before his time, to what the racial issues and what the one is concerned with the other. What is black, one is white, and how both one cannot exist with the other because then you lose the contrast technically. So yeah, there he was very, very far ahead of his time, especially with this way of thinking, and I mean it's it's very good legacy that he was able to leave behind all massive, like, I think, like he's bigger now than anybody was back then. There isn't ef you know, you don't. You go on Youtube and all these audio tapes are like four million, five million players, if not exactly, and it's just one of his lectures or talks or whatever it might be. There is one book that I would like to suggest, especially for someone like you that's also starting and that wanting to learn, I think, especially with its I. Life Sciences, and this is what they call them, body language is a big thing. So I don't know if you able to get your hands on this, the definitive book of body language by Alan and Barbara peas very, very good. I'll send you links to them as well. Yeah, there's all. There's actually a free kindle download that you can do, and I mean for the people listening. Just go online, find the book. It's it's it's honestly life changing to be able to also just read and listen to body language. It sounds interesting, but, yeah, the natural thing. No, appreciate that. I mean I think that's an interesting point as well, like with communications and the like, I think I don't know. I can't remember the actual statistics of verbal and nonverbal communications. Not Seventy percent that we between, seventy seventy five percent that we must of our communication is done non verbally in the sense of all mannerisms and body language. You can see why, like I, I watch these like military programs. Okay, you know, these are ever seen, never heard of SAS who does win? Yeah, is and they take like civilians and they put them through training like people, authoritarian people who like in the military, the police. They they're almost like human life detectives. Yeah, and you can they, like you say, I body language. They just know if somebody's lying or help somebody, you know, is feeling all what they're saying, and you can kind of, you think, our important like it is to be able to read by language, especially, you know, not just in that sense, but like even if you're lucky, you know business definitely, either you know you're doing, you're doing a business there, or somebody that's that's very it's very true that you say that. I mean to be more persuasive. You have to have a specific body language as well. Yeah, HMM, and it's like probably the tonality of your voice as well, isn't it? Like, you know, it's like your voice, your body language, you where your way, your eyes look okay, has a parts playing the communication somewhere, doesn't it's quite it's quite fascinating. Definitely, definitely. Look, that's that's where the fascination, at least for me, stemmed from. I first read the definitive book of body language...

...and then thought look, but I kind of I understand this stuff, but I'm going to understand what's going on in the person's mind as well. So that's whether the love for the social psychology side came in, and just being able to bind these two together is is, at least in my line of work, is very useful for training and obviously counseling people as well. Nice. It's definitely a factive isn't and I think it's so interesting to learn about sociology and psychology and how people, you know, think and bathe like. So in your work, like, what is it that you do? Like your work? Well, I've got a private practice that I run. It's basically just besides the social psychology studies that I did, I did a course in addiction treatment for clinical specialists. So what I would basically do is we have in the local community with this whole pandemic and they be thing that happened. People have been having a lot of mental distress. In that sense, I have an online consulting that I would provide to the guys. Got A group, mostly through word of mouth, and I would provide counseling sessions, usually to the guys for free, especially to our mostly focused towards the millennials, but I mean not necessarily just to them. It's just, I think, the really the most relatable, let's say, Group of people that has been coming to to the actual sessions past, really really rewarding and I think, yeah, it's really positive, fend, but you're doing a thing like it's it's very much needed, especially especially now I know for what how how it started was basically just actually wanting to entertain people on how to deal with your own thoughts and how to deal with this. Not to put any other profession down, I think there's up until let's say the last thirty for the years, there hasn't been a lot of investment in the sense or research in the sense of how to actually improve mental states. It was just studied. So the mental state was just studied in the sense, and I like to like the saying, is the study of insanity doesn't lead to sanity. So what a lot of the social psychology studies and life sciences like life coaching and cognitive behavior or therapy, actually started addressing that more in the sense of fine, we know what the problem is. I'm whatever it might be. You have a statter, you have some schizophrenia instead of just labeling it and sending the person on the way. It can be treated now and it can be it can be managed. So that's that's obviously that's that's where the biggest the biggest motivation for me came from, is to actually just be able to tell people listen, that's fine, you can have that label, but you can also relabel it in that science kind of HMM. Yeah, no, that's it, I mean, and I think it's, like I said, probably not enough research has got have gone into it or like from them, I mean fun things on kind up until recently, you know, with because they've...

...noticed certain trends, and the you know, with mental health awareness and how it how people have, you know, done things themselves. As you know, there's a lot of probably increases in statistically in mental health, I mean just in mental health, only in the past three years. People have actually been, let's say, seeing it as a not just as a condition, but something that can be treated and that can be managed, that can be cultivated, because it's it's also something that everybody needs to practice. I mean it's like if you want to get fitted in the gym, you go daily or you go however, you go the same with mental health. It's something that we need to practice and and the more awareness there is that's that's obviously the better. Yeah, now, I completely agree and I think like especially with you know what something now a lot of people so from with mental health. They're not. They haven't been able to do the things I usually do. Thought make my definitely. Definitely, and they're still in if you think about it, if back in the day you can buy your parents would probably be able to tell you if you asked either your dad, your mom or whoever, if they've ever went for counseling or went to see a therapist. It's not quite likely that they that they did, because there's there's quite a big stigma around what what therapy in regards to mental health is. Just like you're not, you don't have to be crazy in that sense, whatever you would perceive as being crazy to actually go to someone just for some assistance and guidance. And I mean if that that stigma's obviously it's decreasing a lot, which is great. Yeah, that's, I think, like B scept a stigma. That's quite big thing. I think it's in different cultures as well. Asn't it? Different cultures and different battings the parts of the world. It's like an knowner, I think, especially it's not halfings, hot Qu half and then as well, because it's that kind of like, you know, cowboys don't cry. Get Yeah, yeah, that's it's one of the phrases that I do like to say, that cowboys do cry. I mean the more intact you are with your emotions, that actually, if you know what's going on, you able to deal with it. If you know that you don't know what's going on, you can deal with any because you don't know what's happening, and I think that's the first step of this being able to I guess it is being vulnerable, and that's that's where all of us are little bit scain. That sense is just it's some vulnerability that's needed. Yeah, no, I agree, and I think like you've got to be vulnerable and you're going to got to go into those places and you kind of have to go in with to, you know, tune into what's going on. But I know this. When I did my coaching course there was I think, seventy, seventy percent of the people on my course and my group well, you know, like women as like, you know, a lot of put onmonly like women the Horse. But I think there are more, you know, male the more males who doing coach and but I think many years ago, I think is prominently quite more towards to the two female look. I mean I think that also has has to do with the saints that women do tend to be a little bit more nurturing than most men do and, as you said, it might be from the upbringing side as well. So it's not surprising that that is I'm sure that will be a driving factors,...

...though, because, I mean, you want to go, you already vulnerable, you already fragile, so going to someone that might be more nurturing. We don't always think of men as nurturing. It's more, well, from what we've been taught, more barbaric and utilitarian, if you want. Yeah, no, I said. I mean, but it's like, you know, anyone can tune some emotions, you know, it doesn't matter where it's a matther woman, I think. I think the thing is a lot of people don't like feeling vulnerable. A lot people don't like going into things, so they choose to like play off, but I think by doing that you can probably make it worse as more than they self sabotage, even though we but it's essential none. So I can I do agree with you that that's it does come down to self sabotage. We do do that a lot as humans. HMM, it's interesting. I think you, like a lot of it kind of probably come down to like parent you know, parenting as well. Let's start to the people were surrounded by. Who would you say your role models job and by any role models, anyone you like, like look up to? I don't know if you have heard of a guy called Weste Watson, is an American kind of also in a motivational speaker, I guess, mostly into the fitness side of things. He had an interview with country. Remember exactly what it was, but if you go and research in a little bit quite and down to Earth way of doing things, if I can say it like that, very direct, no kind of no bullshit kind of type of vibe. So it also it's it kind of I think it woke something in me or installed something in me, in the sense of just if you want, if you want progress, you'll you going to need to work towards it. I mean, the years are going to go by, you might as well use them productively. So that's kind of one of the things. Like before it I would maybe in roll in something and then spend a month and then you get bored and you go to something else, and that's one of the things that I learned. There is no instant in life and usually if it is, it's either too good to be true it's not really worth it. So that that was a big thing for me, just being able to being able to take some of the words at that he said and how he said it quite direct actually found him when I start watching watching the video, I thought just this guy's quite arrogant because he's quite a big built, jacked dude, and his story is kind of it comes from. He spent some time in prison, then came out and then found a whole different perspective on life and how to go about it. So kind of made me think as well, it's like, listen, this quite came out of that and potentially life and made something even more positive from that. So it's it's a very interesting I think he's got his own podcast as well, but if you want, I will send those links through you can share them with the audience as well. Very, very good, good guy to listen to as well. He's in my opinion. Yeah, of course, like, yeah, that that meal. I like to look and listen to it.

I think it would make a big impact. Yeah, at least you know my yeah, because I think it's important, doesn't you know, to you know, to who listen to and what you watch. I think you know all got our preference, but I think people like that who come from a place, they they come from a place and themselves, you know, gone through certain things alive. Definitely, you know, say how it is. I think that's why I like Gary be a lot, because he's very to the poor vt, the Garry Bena Chok exactly. He's very straight shooter. I do yellow Linkedin as well. Yeah, I do like he's way of thinking, very down to Earth exactly. Like you said, very straight shooter. Yeah, it's powerful. I think it cuts through the corrupt, doesn't it? He's very bound definite, you know, definitely. But now it's important to have role models, isn't it? You know, our people, to surround yourself around certain kinds of people. We do learn from them. That's I mean. What is it that, I think is would warrant buffet. That said, that's like you can't learn everything in life, so might as well learn from the people that have already learned those things and and take it from there. It's actually as it's a major hoodle that gets taken away. You don't have to go and learn the one way. I did it already. Just he has the he has the map, kind of, I guess. Yeah, no, it's completely a so it's a really good point, but but yeah, like it's kind of like round the way is. Is there anything you like? You'd say it's people like who could listen to this, probably shopping with evntual health or struggling this pandemic at all. But looking the guys that are listening, if any of you listeners, everyone to hit me up, either email or a DM, whatever it might be. I'm always willing to reply and listen. So that's one thing I'll put out there for you as well. It doesn't matter. And then, obviously just we can't be perfect, but we can be permanently better at what we do and the only thing we can the only way we can do that is actually by practicing. So I mean, I think this is the same with you, just these podcasters, is going to improve and just grow to something very big. I don't know how if you found this experience where you podcasting. Yeah, no, I completely great. I've that's a really good point, I think, like I said, for Podcasting, yeah, I've definitely learned a lot. I I definitely keep on learning as well, you know, and I think like it's given me a lot different perspectives and, you know, it's also improve my business skills as well. It's great to connect with people like yourself, you know, it's very, you know, motivating and inspiral. Now, well, I'm really glad that you make contact, Adam, and that we were able to do have our podcast. I thinktually, I'm actually very glad to be part of your movement and you're very flattered. Thank you very much. Now, you're very welcome, very very welcome, and now I appreciate you being on and it's been us, as you talk, to decision, but definitely in touching more. Definitely, do you do this? I will astately do that. Yeah, please feel free give me an invitem whenever you want to. Shut Yeah, thank you, but but not take care my son. Now I've a great day. Thank you. That's have a good one. Cheers, take a.

In-Stream Audio Search

NEW

Search across all episodes within this podcast

Episodes (102)