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The Parrsitivity Podcast
The Parrsitivity Podcast

Episode 29 · 1 year ago

The Parrsitivity Podcast #Episode 73 Patrick Cremin

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

In today's episode I'm joined by Patrick Cremin, Patrick is a TV/voice actor who's appeared in video games, TV programs, TV commercials and theatre performances! Here is a list of some of his work: EastEnders, doctors, Stockwell, the bill, Roman mysteries, casualty, heartbeat, Murphy's law, silent witness, hustle, heavenly sword, soothers tv ad. Contact: https://www.spotlight.com/interactive/cv/1/M3564.html --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/the-parrsitivity-podcast/message

Hither my name is Adam Po and the podcast host posity to podcast. In this podcast, you will be listened to me connect with people from different walks of life, from the military to people in the music industry, to people in the self help industry and many other areas of life. In this podcast I'll be talking about topics from self help, mental health, motivation, spirituality, mindset, society, current affairs and much, much more. If you enjoy this podcast, please subscribe, share and let me know your feedback. And my main intention on this podcast is to have a positive impact for you, the lit the listener, to take something positive from it, to apply something positive into your life from this. Now with without further ado, let's go to podcast and enjoy. Hi'm not going to suppose this podcast. On today's episode I'm with Patrick Cremon. Patrick is a really good family friend of mine. He's a TV and voice actor and has been in many TV programs, from eastenders, doctors, stockwell, Roman mysteries, Hustle, heartbeat casualty, footballers, wives, bodily harm, Bill Son and witness, Murphy's law, rescue me, families and many more. He has also starred in the video game heavenly sword as a voice actor in that game and has appeared in many, many TV commercials. He attended the Central School of speech and drama and was has also done theater performances as well. In this podcast we talked about how he got into how Patrick got into acting, and the importance of following what you love to do in life and much, much more. I provided the short show reel of some of his work. Would you can listen to in a second, but I hope you sit back, relax and enjoy this episode. Is To tweet the symptoms of section even s. What does your bank manager know about cars? Is the big end about to go about to buy a lemon? That's why, when you take out an AA, Carlo will give you a free car inspection. That's a hundred nineteen pounds. When you've got a cold, sort don't hide. Red Team of bines and six. I Think Code Name for Osmond is nettle tip. Like the the I said, we've been asked to contain far arms. Will make the start. got a decision to make right now, but you most probably good about twenty seconds. Do you want this man detained? If you do, we can do it, but I need an answer now. I've told him that's a bother calling, but then, sist, you tell me that it's not true. Of course told you don talking around counties with a pair of finders like some Hipi true. That's good morning, Adam. Thank you for coming on a podcast through A. Really appreciate it, my pleasure. So, yeah, so like your you do, like you've done, like voice acting, acting, and you've been in many TV commercials, from like Suiver's adverts, bank commercials, and I think people you know will recognize your voice. And well, if I was to say to you strep sells first aid for...

...sore throats, you might recognize that. That is something. I did that for eight years. So people must have been sick of the sound of it, but it was good fun, really good form. Those I love doing voices because you go, you know you're in a studio and when you when they play it back over a huge sound system, it's like you're in a movie theater. Well, so it's very it's very rewarding, but that's only you know, that's my kind of bonus acting. My main acting is stage and TV. HMM. That's what I still really enjoy doing and, believe it or not, I've been doing it for thirty three years. Makes me feel rather weak to contemplate and I'm still here. I'm still going. Yeah, I've been very lucky. I've obviously got a MODERC and of talent, otherwise I wouldn't still be here, but I am. Yeah, still love it. So, yeah, often that's like most actors. I could probably talk about myself all day. So so be careful. Yeah, no, it's absolutely fine. I mean it's yeah, it's about you know you're why. You know why you do what you do and it's interesting to to hear about it because I think you've done so many different things and being in so many different things. It's interesting to hear about it because you've been in light eastanders using that recently as well. Yeah, that was his. Last year I played character called Muskie who was a friend of Jack Browning. Is One of the regular characters. Such good fun to do because you're part of it and also they kind of once you've got the part, they're putting their faith in you and they sort of leave you to your own devices so you can do your own performance. Obviously, if it's if it's rubbish or to outlandish, then they'll have a word, but they basically let you get on with it, which is really, really good fun. That's quite good, I suppose, isn't it? They can kind of let you kind of like, not run free, but well, exactly. And, as I say, if it's too much. But I just had I had a lot of fun because, as you can prob Retel, I'm quite middle class, but I was playing a cockney police who was quite rough and it's always con fun to go out of your own comfort zone and out of your own skin and be someone else, which is, as you probably know as a man who works with people's psychology, that's a lot of the reasons people go into acting because, though, they enjoy being somebody else, which probably says a lot about them. But you've got you got to love it as well, obviously, because it's such a difficult profession and you spend ninety nine percent of the time twiddling your thumbs, staring at the phone, only to be told sorry, love you know they didn't like you. And yes, sort of you have to get used to that, obviously, but all actors are used to that and used to being on the doll sum of the time. But of course, when we're actually working. It's brilliant. That's why I'm still doing it, because I love it. Stage is a bit different because it's stay. Is Much harder work, obviously, because you know, intensive rehearsal for five or six weeks. Got To learn all the lines and you're under pressure every night on stage and you can't muck about and if you if you fluff, they can't say cart you have to just pick it up up again. But that's got its own rewards, obviously, because you're in you're interacting with an audience and they're giving you immediate approbation for what you're doing. About quite intense as well, doesn't it, because you're literally you are in the limelight and if you make a mistake or very good yes, literally in the limelight. Yes, yeah, yeah, yes, you can, I mean. And occasionally I've been on stage and haven't got a clue what I'm supposed to say next. I did yes, Prime Minister in Frinton, which was incredibly good fund as I played the Prime Minister and in the second half he's on stage for the whole second act and it was a very, very hot summer, summer of two thousand and fifteen and print at the theater at Frinton, which is great, but it's like a sort of tin box. So get incredibly hot and you feel like you're going to pass out. And halfway through the second half I was having a chat with somebody about so I can't remember,...

...but I can I just went I was so hot and tired I just went completely blank and sat there and I just said to one of the other characters, and so Humphrey, any thoughts? and He'St it's yes, Prime Minister Claire's paper was published by the university press, which is what I was supposed to say, because the audience don't notice. They half sleep anyway most of the time. But yeah, things like that happen. It's quite frightening. And the other thing that I'm sure you've heard about his stage fright, which people have never been on stage don't really get. And what it is is you it's like someone's pulled the plug out. Pull you'll plug out of the socket and all your energy suddenly drains away because when you're on stage you're up the whole time. Your energy, it's like juggling. You've got tennis balls in the air all the time. You have to have that energy to be watchable, obviously, and when all the energy drains out and you haven't got a clue where you are, what you're supposed to say, what you're doing, it's very, very scary and it only lasts probably a split second, but you feel like the audience have been staring at you for half an hour and you haven't. They have. It's happened to me a couple of times. Is Horrible. Who's that in the background interrupting? That's just one of my neighbors, right, okay, yeah, so you have stage. Fine. Yeah, it happens twice and there are some actors who just trying to think who someone who died recently who stopped doing stage because they had stage from and they's so metrified about getting it again because it it really is frightening. Anyway, it's very rare, is it. Some must like it's almost like anxiety. Yeah, it's kind of a panic attack. Yeah, I think I experience that once when I did I did a play at my school in when I when I was in primary school. I did brewster, played rooster and the Anni Anni musical. Oh right, yeah, it's like a mean you know, probably main part and I remember the first time we did it properly in front of like an audience. Like I think I experience that stage right that you mentioned, where I literally my lines. Yeah, I was talking about my I was speaking my lines. I just went blank. I just had a prons well, you know what I'm talking about. Yeah, yeah, yes, and need and then you suddenly kind of wake up out of it and think where the hell am I? Oh yes, oh, yes, yes, I'm on stage right. Yeah, but apparently when I the very first time I ever had it, one of the girls in the cast, it was the country wife, which is a restoration, come with you, and I was playing the lead, and she said, my God, you went white as a sheet. Was that you actually going to faint? So that's what it feels anyway. Obviously the the best, the best medium is I've done a few radio plays and they are a joy because you don't have to learn the lanes. Oh Wow, which sounds crash, but you don't. It's all their can. Yeah, it's on a just, it's on a plint in front of you, on a dais in front of you. Obviously you can't turn the pages. You have to und clip everything first, and it helps if you've actually bothered to read it, but it's that's that's really good fun as well. I suppose that that pressure and that anxiety is probably good in some aspect because I think you can kind of turn out, you know, you kind of use that channel him to like absolutely you need it. Yeah, and the the very worst feeling is the first night of a show when you're playing the lead and you're standing in the wings and you're just thinking, I would like to be anywhere else in the world but here. Yeah, and no, seriously, it's just what the hell have I got myself into? Because you don't know how it's going to go, you don't know how the audit's going to react, you don't know if you're going to know your opening line. And you're quite right, you need to have that fear. You can feed off it and it kind of boys you up and it gives you that energy that makes the audience want to watch you, because if an actor just kind of lobs on to the stage lifeless, that's not watchable. It's kind of that's the offer opposite of stage presents, which is what we like to watch on stage, somebody who's confident and...

...energized. Yeah, talking of Yeah, when I was at drama school, one of my mates kept forgetting his lines. He just has on having having to call to the stage manage at line line, and he was in it. He was in a show in our second year and the curtain went up and then this pair of shoes went hurtling across the stage because he'd forgotten to put them on. Someone has someone had to throw them across the set the wings where he was waiting, which are coursed through, him completely. So he then, this is an apocryphal story from the Central School Speach and drama, he then came on with his best buddy and they're supposed to have been having a drink and a laugh and they're both going ha ha ha ha, who ha ha ha, and then my mate went line are no, completely thrown himself anywhere. So people, people were watching, an audience were watching. Yes, it was a second year show, but what they used to do was get the hold of the Central Schools Beach and drama, which has, you know, lots of different department so everyone would be forced to come into the theater and watch, just, you know, to give us a taste of what it's actually properly like. Yeah, in front of House. I suppose that as well gives you, it's all good experience for when you then do lights a film acting like because that, I think, that's really fun yourself out out your comfort zone, isn't it? Doing that on stage and then going to a studio side of it? That probably prepares you for it, doesn't it? Like? They're very, very it's a very, very different craft, if you like, because TV and film acting it's it's very intensely about your face and particularly about your eyes, m which is why good actors, you see, they very rarely blink on TV, as soon as you blink, your kind of breaking a moment. So yeah, it's stage is incredibly high energy and powerful, and then TV is got to the intensity is got to be right inside you and you've got to be super confident and know exactly what you're doing and barely barely move a muscle of your face because every time you do, it tells the audience something. HMM, but that's good. That's good fun in itself, because then you see it back and you think, actually, yeah, that worked. M. I'm not saying I'm any good, but you know I'm all right. No, yeah, I got watch I what's sure like your film on real what's your film Rin? I saw that I using the bill so as my brief first job, actually for a first TV job in one thousand nine hundred and eighty nine. I just left the Royal Shakespeare company where I started. And Yeah, I had a lovely little part in the bill playing a riot squared officer called Sergeant Bancroft. And you suddenly realize its TV is a completely different thing when he'd when you just done two years of shouting Shakespeare. HMM, but that was that was a very good introduction. I was very lucky. And then that kind of like, that's like season casualty. Heartbeats. Yeah, I've died twice in casualty. You died twice and casualty. Yeah, and actually, this is this is very silly. I had an accident recently. I've got a big scar on my forehead. I fell over, a Gash my head open and I was up the hospital and the guy was stiching me up Nice, you know, injection in the forehead and then seven stitches. Nice. I'd had more Phee, though, so it's fine, but it's got said to me. He said, so what do you do for a living and I said, Oh, I'm an actor and then I said, and funnily enough we're in casualty here, I've died twice in casualty and he stopped and he said what do you mean? And Oh, I see, you mean acting. You died twice. Yeah, ha ha ha, because, yeah, prettymly medically you can't actually die twice. Yeah, I got yeah, I got shot in heartbeat, which was another brilliant part of playing at playing a rent boy the original poll dark. So I was playing a rent boy on a scooter who's blackmailing Robin Ellis, who, as I said, was the original. Pulled up very, very nice guy, but I was blackmailing him and he sent his show for around to shoot me. I was...

I was dead by halftime. That was it. That was good. That was really good. So I think I saw that clip woison, hearby you in some Parker Jacket turn up. This guy's like most right, yeah, that I want money off, and that's right. Yeah, I can really shift the karats better than it's. I was looking. He was horrible. They they had to mock up a photo of me and him in the s because he was my boyfriend, kind of thing and they, the art department, put somehow photo shopped fake hair onto my head, because I hope wire and the stage manager saw it and said, Oh, yes, you, you would look quite nice if you had here. Are Cheers love? Okay, thanks. Yeah, because I thought you did heavenly. So did like a voice acting for a video game as well, called yeah, yeah, it's this is a while, but this is ten odd years ago. But yeah, they they are not quite so organic and rewarding because that. I did five or six different games and they're quite funny as soon as you go and they say right, listen, we don't want the normal whatever it is video game performance. Okay, we wanted to be natural, cinematic and reserved, and of course by the upter half an hour you're just screaming into a microphone. Get out incoming. And that's what that's what they want. That's what the players want. I presume I've never played one of those. Have you played heavenly sword? I've I've not played it, but I've played games that are similar. So you've got these these cute from the call an MPC's right. There's that you are in the game world, that you can talk to all they say certain things an right. So so we were yeah, we would record five or six different versions of each thing. I presume that's because it's depending on how the game is going, there's going to be a different outcome. Is that right? Yeah, like different reactions to what's happening. Yeah, yes, depending on what you want. The player has done. I'm guessing. I mean I must have done. I'm not tech savvy at all. M In fact, listeners to your podcast might be interested to know that it's taking me quite a while for you to be able to connect to me. Yeah, it sounds I'm just because I'm such a clots. See, it's technical. It means like that. Lots different platforms to use. I think anchor the first one we used. That that didn't work for but we didn't know why. I suspect it was my connection, but I don't. But this is okay and it yeah, yeah, Zo Zoom audio is great, but the yeah, it's it's just technical issues. I think is probably connection both sides. Right. But, but, but I practiced zoom last night with a friend of mine and I couldn't hear a word she was saying. I could see here and and it kept breaking up. And she said I'm going to come to East Bobbbbbba born a week that was just a connection. Anyway, we digress to me. But but so, so so. How did you get into active what got you into it? I've always loved it. At the very first thing I did I played the king. You was presenting me to the Baby Jeezus in the Nativity in one thousand nine hundred and sixty six. That my primary school. Really enjoyed that. Done it. Why? But then at secondary school I did lots of plays. Loved it. Then I went to uni and spent I got a terrible degree because I spent most of my time putting on plays with myself as lead, obviously, as you do, and spending the student unions money on the plays. So then then I just thought you're going to have to I want to do this for a living. So I went to drama school and was very lucky to get into the central schools peach and drama in one thousand nine hundred and eighty four and it just went from there. Three years there and then I was I when I was there you had to be able to work, you had to have an equity card, equity membership, of the Union. HMM, and it's very, very difficult to get it was a sort of catch twenty two. You couldn't work without an equity card and you couldn't...

...get an equity car without work. So I became the children's party entertainer, believe it or not. Wow, every Saturday I would go off and do magic tricks and a puppet show and play games and bloody blah, which is actually quite Goo, because I got fifty quid for an afternoon and got into to equity through that avenue of being a suppose it's variety entertainer, and because of that I was able to get an agent in my third year at drama school and because of that I got two years at the real shapesbook company. Wow, that's awesome. So it's like all these little things like led to you getting into it isn't and it's like, okay, yeah, you have to start from somewhere down you lie, regardless of where you going to. Yeah, and like anything, you've got to have the drive and you've got to have you got to really want it, because it there are so many hurdles in the way, and there are for the rest of your career. I mean that. You know, we all look at the TV and go, Oh, not him again, lady, I could have done that so much better, but that's not the point. Point is you didn't get the part. So you know I I've really team. I have to actors that you know, some actors that you don't see for a while, then they come back and a part absolutely smash it. Yeah, it's interesting, isn't that? That's what happens. It goes in it can go in cycles and it depends what you're casting. Range is. I mean for a long time I looked too young to be playing I'm fifty nine and I was when I was about fifty, I looked about thirty, which is no good because they say to you that why are you here? How old are you? And I actually made mistake once saying how old do you want me to be, and the room said I'll chats up, really trying to be clever. But yeah, I see what you're saying. And it goes in cycles. So you can be flavor of the month, you know, throughout your forties or whatever, and then it can go it can just drop off and then you there's always you're still around and you still got an agent and you're still trying doing something like your own one man show or something like that, or writing a book or whatever. As long as you're as there in the background, it will come back. It always does. I mean a lot of people drop out because they usually because they've got kids and they've got to feed their family and pay the mortgage, so they have to they drop out and do something else, which is quite sad because you know, the dream is obviously dead at that point. HMM. Yeah, I think there's a lot of competition and it isn't and so it's so many people want to be an active man. Just so many of us. Do you have? Sorry, no, sorry, carry on Bo to you. I'm so I'll say. Yeah, do. Do you have a favorite part that you played or what I played? From nineteen nine ninety to nineteen ninety three, I was in a soap opera Granada TV and Manchester, in a show called families, which sadly died a death in one thousand nine hundred and ninety three, but I played a an our young army officer and I turned I made him into a complete gumby and Thicko and I just enjoyed and they started writing for me making him look as stupid as possible and that was just it was almost it turned it almost into comedy. I love doing that. Also, of course, when you're on TV three times a week, there is the other thing about being recognized wherever you go, which is which is quite weird when it first happens. I remember I was in a petrol station. I've just been on holiday and I came back and the show had been on air for about six months and I was at the back of the queue in the petrol station and the bloke at the till shouted out, well, some people have all the luck on TV, don't they? And I turned around to look behind me and there's no me. Suddenly rose he was talking to me and everyone in the shop studied, laughing and sort of pointing at me. I mean usually, usually it's, you know, celebrities Moan about the intrusion of the press and having their phones taps and all that rubbish. But which isn't isn't good. But you know, the flip side is complete strangers coming up and saying I...

...think you're really good. HMM, or they tensed, although they say I don't watch the show myself and you sort of think, well, why are you talking to me that? Do you know? How the hell do you know who I am? Ha Ha, it's I think there's that. There's that balance, not flip side to it is. And there you've got the foot side of people in who work for magazines, have taken pictures and stuff like pap or our season, invading people's privacy. I don't agree with that. And then you've got, like, you know, the fans and everyday people in the public. Oh Yeah, I saw you on so and so. Yeah, exactly, yes, that's that's that's not unpleasant at all and it's quite it bigs you up quite a lot as well, especially if it's an attractive woman. Won't go down that part. Yeah, but because I've known you for like a couple of years, like I remember you saying, Yours your grandfather, that the busses. There's a really interesting Thomas Tilling. Yeah, yeah, he was. He was my great, great great grandfather. The name is still quite well known and he started that really the very first London bus company. He used to delive the milk on a horse and cart in southeast London and he started giving people lifts and he thought well, this is I can start charging them and I'll start doing forget the milk stuff, the milk, I'll start charging them. And and and he created what he called Times buses with a timetable and it mushroomed and at one point I think they had, you know, they were the original London transport and at one point they had something like five thousand horses around London and fifty canteens, you know, where the stables where, where we're each route was based. So they were huge. And then his son, Richard Tilling, took over and had to in about one thousand nine hundred and ten, had to mechanize the whole fleet. And when when the war broke out, the Great War broke out, they remember reading this. Richard sold to the government four hundred horses to go to France, in other words wars. Yeah, so they yeah, they were fabulously wealthy. It's lightly it's been slightly diluted now, you know, generations on, but it's very good story. And Thomas Tilling became been cockney rhyming slang for shilling time. Judy lendser Tommy Tilling, and that was my great great grandfather started. So so inspiring and amazing to hear its. Yeah, you know, you've got it. You've got quite a rich heritage with your family and you know what it's like. It's sort of makes you feel part of something's part of something special. Obviously, you know they sold the company about one thousand nine hundred and forty, I think. And, as I say so, the money got diluted down, but my mom still got quite a lot and the flat I'm sitting in at the moment is bought with Thomas Tilling money. So I'm very lucky. Yeah, that's amazing. I mean I think it's so important to to look into our roots and history. I mean I know a lot of people who don't bother with it or they can't bothered, and I think it's so important because you might find out something amazing, I mean like the with that. You just don't know, do you? Yeah, exactly. Well, exactly. I mean it's it's a stepping stone to who you are. Hm that it's part of you, so you might as well know. You know, let's let's turns out your grandfather's Jack The ripper, which he bla. So we'll be people are okay, we'll finish their I've looked into it. And yes, yeah, I don't really. You just put a black felt it pain through his name. Yeah, that's that's I don't know if you've done ancestry online. That's incredibly exciting because obviously you can't find out everything. I mean I on my Dad's side. His Dad was Irish and we've been able to go back about two generations there because I think, without casteeing his persons on the Irish, I think the records office in Dublin got burnt down. Are You chersome? It's it's very difficult to go much further back than you know a hundred years, but it's definitely it's very saying. It's very, very exciting when...

...things turn up and when other people have been when their family trees cross overall or coincide with yours and they've been able to find things out that you can pinch. Friend of mine, I'm sure you saw Danny Diet who found out he's related to William the conqueror. It's just proposit a friend of mine. He asked me to do it for her and we traced it back and because someone else had done all this work it, things just kept appearing and we went all the way back to one thousand four hundred and ninety two. She a family stair name, which was extraordinary. And what was quite funny she's quite posh and the most of her relatives clearly couldn't write because because that all these parish records had marriage certificaus. They just put an eggs because they were all farm laborers from Suffolk. Wow, it's it's one thousand four hundred and ninety two extraordinary. That's crazy. It is is amazing. I mean like the ancestry. As kind of talking of ancestry, somebody a Mo my bye my dad's side, basically by my granddad. My Dad's dad passed away in this forty. Had A hard time very early on. He joined the army many years ago before he had my dad and my Auntie's etc. And basically a woman gone in touch my dad's my aunt in, my dad sister, yeah, and has been doing her ancestry and she claimed that my granddad had had a kid and she was the daughter of then. Oh my God, what the Your Dad and your aunt didn't know. But Yeah, my dad, my two answer know anything about not. Why? Oh My oh, my dad's mom. So that's something that happened recently, right key, we actually, I mean definitely definitely, cause, like you know, think of emotion, because they didn't know anything about it, and it's quite, you know, it's like a mixer. Ma, it's almost like it's my dad felt quite excited and then, yeah, quite emotional, you know, as you would be. But this woman's a lot older now and she she's in a s or S. so, yeah, that happened and that's kind of in as long as she she didn't turn up saying, Oh, by the way, I'm your half sister. Can I have ten grand yeah, yeah, are you made notice? I don't look anything like you, but I'm promise you, I am. I am your half sister. Yeah, that's way, yeah, yeah, like so, yeah, yeah, just paypal of me, but but there. I mean, it can work in good ways, but I think it can definitely throw do you know it's me and it can definitely still up a lot. Yes, but then again, that it's life, isn't it? I mean, you know, how'd you know? How do you move forward of that when things all our rise? It's, you know, everyone's definitely your dad and your aunt. Are they going to keep in touch with it? Have I don't know, I don't know, but this is did she find them using ancestry? Yeah, he's an ancestry and I think looking through facebook or something like that. Right, Blimey. So see what happens. But but yeah, I mean she's your she's your aunt in effect, be be like in some some aspect. Yeah, just, yeah, got different because I yeah, basically through my grand ide yeah. So, yeah, but if she's your it's your dad's half sister. She's your half aunt, as it half an't yeah, that's what I know. Is Less. Will just turn onto the so, yeah, it's interesting. I mean I but anyway, back to me. Yeah, but would you, would you say you have any role models, jovny role models? Only one look like, look up to. I've got I've certainly got favorite actors, like Richard Harris these it's like the older actors, obviously, and Dead Robert Show, Marcus Rashford, obviously. That's yeah, he lockdown. Yeah, I think he's done really well with terms of breaks, of...

...raising money and putting money into yeah, and he'ste's very lucid and he's very calm and you know, the politicians can't really really deny him because he's got great support and he talks sent and he's doing it for the right reason. He's not selfseeking or self serving. He's doing it because he believes in it. And you know how good to make pull it the prime minister do a you turn. Very rarely happens. So he's not a role model, obviously, because he's about a third of my age, but he's very answerable. Yeah, now I think. Yeah, I think it's important, you know, to do things like how what he's done, I mean especially untime voice. Yeah, if you've got a platform and a voice and people are listening. Yeah, he's done exactly the right thing. I mean, yeah, most celebrities or football as whatever are in it for themselves and for the cash and for the the fame and fortune. They're not interested in giving anything, anything back. But obviously he can see, you know, his old community in with and Shure. You can see what's going on and he's trying to help, because he was there. I don't know if you saw the interview on the BBC with him in his garden and there's a there's a he's sitting on the wall talking to selling Nugent, the interviewer, and there's a little five a side goals at the end of the garden with a bent cross bar and he's think, Marcus, I cous mate, you're on so you underground a week? Yeah, and someone's bent the Cross bar of your five a side girl, and sorry, funny. Anyway, I did. I did see that my hand cock got his name wrong or something like that. If he was interview by Sky News and he got his name wrong and then he corrected his name and I was like what did you kill it? Couldn't Daniel Mar they couldn't daniels start. You got him Daniel. Yeah, you can't. That's right. Yeah, running NHS. Yeah, says a lot, doesn't it? But did you have any favorite books, Patrick, that you like to read form? Do you read it all? Yeah, I read a lot. Actually, I had to move all my books yesterday because I'm getting a new carpet. This is it, you cap, it's all my books had to be moved out. Yeah, I really like dirt bow guards, autobiographies and Michael Palin around the world in eighty days. I always read when I'm on holiday. HMM, don't quite no, woman and sort of makes sense. I put that need to mention, to be quite honest, hmm. Yeah, no, it reading is important that you learn so much. Yeah, and it keeps your brain buzzing. So I'm going to. I like doing cross the cryptic crosswords as well, and the more you read, the first of your brains go. So it's question of making time for it, though, obviously. Yeah, exactly here. I mean, you know, being an out of work actor, of course I had absolutely no spare time, which is a complete lie, obviously. Yeah, always good to do, to read and do things up you enjoy doing. is another and that's what I talked about a lot and I think you know it's great that you do what you do and that you love it. Yeah, I'm very I feel very lucky, because you see so many people who are who are tired and board and they have to go to work every day doing something they're not interested in. No, I'm I'm I'm terribly lucky that I found something that still is a passion and you know, I'm excited about whatever I'm going to do next. I have no clue what it's going to be, but it'll be something. Probably time I went back on stage again, I think. But yeah, I be interesting to see how with this credavirus thing. How to going to the whole, I suppose, the whole set up of stages and sets and over and I's got all going to change. Defense well, hopefully if the you know, the social distancing goes down to one meter so all the pubs and restaurants can reopen. You know, hopefully the its will start up again soon ish, but it's a tricky one. I mean, I don't quite understand why people are allowed on planes without social distancing. Yeah, it's where they're not allowed to sit in the theater. Yeah, I did see that heart bit in that Happy Sigh Emmadele they did the...

...filming and I think they there was some people with coronavirus symptoms that send them away. Oh really, I didn't see that. Okay, that's the weird thing. Do the soaps, when they start production starts again, do they mention the virus? Do they have characters wearing face masks? I'm personally think we've all had enough of it. And okay, they need to be true to life, but do you really watch a program in your leisure time that reflects the horror of lockdown? I'm sure I'm not, because it's there's beyonce. A pause doesn't they? I think in the filming like pick off from somewhere, and that's the how can you pick up from where it was left after siely without, yes, without mentioning why that there was a pause? Yeah, because the east ends are there's usually six weeks. It's usually six weeks from production to transmission. So obviously they've run out of stock, which I don't think they're even on at the moment. Till I don't know. I just think probably being repeats if it's on. But but I suppose they just now. I was going to say all they just shove on a football match euros to don or the World Cup final sixty six or whatever, which is pretty desperate, but an unlimited supply of quite popular TV spot. Well, just play a few Liverpool Games, you know, it's always good. Yeah, but all, I don't think we should go down that route. So, yeah, because I think you and I are on different sides of the fest. What's like? What is silly? Obviously Liverpool deservedly are going to win the title, but it seems a bit silly. Just let them play their two games, win them, give them the trophy and then stop. Stop the season. Although of courses then there's the relegation issue, there's The qualifying for Europe issue the other teams are going to be involved in, but lucky for Loipol, they can just sort of give up to games. Yeah, no, Su clear. We'll be interest and see how things pan out in terms of football and TV society. I fear this is going to go on a lot longer than we think, because it's like it's so possible there's going to be a second spike. I can leave because we're out now also complacent about it. We think it's safe to do anything we want. Yeah, we well, I speak for myself obviously. I think we like you said, people can get to relax and almost forget sometimes. So you know that things I've happened and this like, you kind of have to still kind of like beyond guard a little bit with it. Is there? Is there any parts in films or series that you wish you would have got? I don't know. That's a very difficult question. All I anything that you would like to do that you haven't if I make sense, or any anything that? No, think quite honest, I'm happy with with whatever I'm asked to play M although I have to say I've been up for the crown, you know, the Netflix series, the crown, you Joe Really, I've been up for it six times and read for six different parts and not got one of them. And after a while I said to my age, and this is sort of taking the piss lightly, isn't it, all they're doing is wheeling in people like me who they know can probably do the job, just to fill in the casting list, you know. So that so that it does give directors an option because they know I can you know, then I can read well and I look. You're right, dish. So that's that got a bit tedious. I think is well to do. HMM. Yeah, I mean I think. Well, we've when you apply or when you do these auditions, is, I like, a long time frame between when you do it and when you actually hear backs. You might do an audition. I hear anything for like four months. Well, that's that's one of our grapes is that if you don't get it, you don't hear anything. So you can sit there twiddling your thumbs for a couple of weeks. Very often you hear them. If you get it, you'll hear the next day or they might say to you on the day. That's perfect. Will Book you for that. That's happened to me. I've got it on the...

...same day, which is just brilliant. But and usually after about two days you know you haven't got it if you haven't heard anything, although I have that to say. When I did east enders, I auditioned in the beginning of June and I was in the west end doing a voiceover for something, I can't remember what it was, and complaining to somebody in the reception about he had come down all the way from the Lake district to do this voice over with me, and I said that's a bit of a slip and he said yeah, but you know it's put it's it is what it is, that I have to do it, and I said it's a it's a pain those in it. It's like I went all the way up to Weil street audition forrest enders a couple of weeks ago and you think, well, that was a waste of time, I've heard nothing, and then, of course, walking to the tune my phone goes it's my agent. Oh Yeah, they're booked you forrest enders. So it can happen. It can happen that you wait ages and then you get the job. But, as I said, usually you can feel it in your gut that the job is gone after a couple of days. If you've heard nothing but the horrible things. You know, in what other profession? I'm starting to rent now. In what other profession do you go for a job interview and then get told nothing? At least they have the decity to write your letter saying actually, you are shit. At least you know. Yeah, I I've had to interviews where like yeah, De haven't sell anything. I think really wanted not even a letter. Yeah, I've had had a job interview, once for a close shop. I'm not going to name drop it. Oh gold and yeah, and the GUY, the guy turn up, lady gave me the interview. I think he was like hungover. I'd the interview with them once, had a coffee and I y'all get back to you this in the week. Didn't hear anything so rude, because you've made the effort. Yeah, product in your hair, you know, and yeah, that's suit. Yeah, but so does that. Does that one as well? Then I had one for an estate agents and had the chat first time around the interview and then he was like you got the second into so I was like, bought a suit, you know what, brand new suit, and when for the interview? Had the interview. As all, you got another one, as like great, so had for a free interviews. What's okay? And then then there's a I come back in for a chat and I'm on the fourth chat, which is like a casual interview. There was a oh yeah, we're not advertising for the job anymore. Something with the weird, weird. What's yeah, it did you believe that he's been serious? And then what? They just pulled the job. They just pulled the job from that that place. They just they were advertising for a job that they couldn't fill. That or they might have filled it internally. And then it gets worse and the then I had a phone call for a another job, the same position and a different branch, and then they invite me for an interview and then the day before they canceled the interview and said they recruit internally. That's what did. Let's take you the PISS and I was like Picul as. They obviously they knew you right there and after four chats or whatever. So that's probably similar to like some you know some. Well, yeah, I mean I the worst one was there was a show called under the under the Hammer, I think it was, with Richard Wilson. Yes, is about one thousand nine hundred and ninety four, Richard Wilson and Jan Francis, and I went up for Jan Francis's husband, and so I went for the interview and they said Yeah, that's great. Can you come back again tomorrow to meet the directors? So I went back the next day, met the directors. Yeah, brilliant. Can you come back in and meet John Mortimer next week? The author, John mortimerly writes rump holes, the Bailey and all that. Yeah, so I went and met John Mortimer, who didn't seem to like me at all. And I've read the same scenes again, you know, and and this is so, this is three weeks and then the following Monday my agent phone up said can you go in for a screen test, and I said are you? Are you having a laugh? They see me three times now. I've met the author, I've met the directors, I met the producers and they want me to do a screen nest. So I went and did this wretched screen test. I was obviously crap, and waited another week...

...and then I just sawed, do I really want to do this job? And then the phone rang and made and said Patrick, Morning Love, how are you? And I said, don't just spit it out if you got bad news. Yeah, they they've gone down another route and I said, and it took me four weeks to decide to go down another route, and he said, yeah, I think. I think John Mortimer thought you were two upper class and I just said, well, perhaps John Mortimer could have said it on the day anyway. Anyway, to know that that's it's crazy, isn't it? Like the whole process of it and how they can just don't I don't see how organizations and businesses or certain industries can lead people on and that way. I suppose it is what it is. They hold. They hold all the cards, don't they? I mean it in job is the actors are bottomed with absolute bottom of the pile, because we're also desperate for the job. So it doesn't matter if the producers don't tell you haven't got it, because you're hardly going to phone up and go right, I'm never working for you again, because you won't. If you do that, and I presume you you phone this date. Agent and gave him a mouthful. I went into the brand digi. Yeah, just have no through paper files on the floor now. I just I just went in and I always I needed work at that time and I would like I've spent money that I haven't got really on a suit for a job to go for, and then this has happened and they're like well, we the managers in here, blah, blah, give a call back on Wednesday. I'm sorry about this. It's like I'll just like, well, I just let them know. You know, that good, good for you. Made you feel one percent better. Yeah, yeah, so you came out of it with a new suit. Yeah, so it's it's not. You know, there's a perk to it. You know, there's with a negative as a positive. So that's where I see it. Would would have been of been any mileage and you saying to them after the second interview, can you please tell me today if I've got the job or not? HMM, pretty told you to get stuffed actually, wouldn't they? Yeah, they well, I did say one want to hear back, and they said I'll probably in a week or two. We've got a few more interviews. Yeah, it's all it's all, it's all experience, our life lesson dust. Of course, why we all love is date agents as well. Yeah, because they're they are almost subhuman. Yeah, it's a different, different, different world. You kind of once you going corporate setting. Not Your corpor setting isn't bad, but some people within that just operate very differently. Yeah, I mean state agents are kind of cutthroat out there and they'll do anything to get your property on their books. Yeah, it's sold, they're off. Yeah, which is fine, I suppose, but there is what it is. There isn't that, I suppose, in that, but that game. I actually I sold up my flat in Primrose Hill in London about twenty years ago and the state agents couldn't do enough for me during the process, absolutely couldn't do enough, and got me lots of viewings and then they got me an offer which I accepted and then I thought, hang on a set that that offers twenty grand too little, and I phone them up with a bloke said well, you're that's rather stupid if you don't know me, saying so, you've accepted the offer, you can't now go back on it, and I thought okay, that's that's fair. Enough. Then, on the day I moved, I came down the steps front of my house as the estate agent happened to be walking past on another job, and he completely blanked me, like we don't need you anymore. I'm not going to be polite and say good morning, it's going to Blak you. So, yeah, I couldn't. I couldn't be like that. I can't be one of those people. I couldn't. What's you know? Yeah, let's let's try and be happy rather than making loads of money and miserable. MMM, that's that's definitely that flip side, isn't it? You know, people in life make you chasing money, you know. I mean, yeah, K money is great, but you could have all that money in the world not be happy. If you're doing something you're happy, then that money will follow onto it. It's some people have got it kind of mixed the mixed up. Are you charging me for this, by the way? Yeah, I just send to stummy check in the postext it's...

...a life check, coaching lesson. Yeah, no, of course not. That's fine. The meters running, yeah, but but not when you do your acting. Do you like to get into part and get into that role like I see some actors really really embody that role, like like the Heath Ledger with a joke on. Mean that's pretty different a sitcoms where he likes talking about that's huge character acting, isn't it? And it's overacting, but it works, obviously. Do you ever do that or like gainst that part? How do you get stars? It depends. You have to find a voice to start with. You know, you have to decide how you're going to speak, which sounds obvious, but it's got to then feel right to you. HMM. You know when, obviously east ends, I had to Plamei as a Cockney, as I said, and I actually I had to. I found a quite famous actor who I used to work with, a nice play football with, who's got a very deep cottony accident, and I just I kind of I started trying to impersonate him and I thought, yeah, this is actually works because he sounds quite rough. She's what the blow was supposed to be. Also physically you've got to feel that you are that person. HMM. You might, you know, find us a strange walk or a way of standing, but usually most of it comes through the lines. Obviously, you know what theyver it, need to say. But I'm not a method actually, you know, I don't kind of you know, if I'm playing a butcher, I don't go and buy a chicken and cut it into pieces or tends that part like literally. It's ridiculous. I mean, didn't oliviate famously say to Dustin Hoffman? Hoffman was kind of getting it? I think they were in a play together. I can't remember, but does it. Olivia saw Dustin Hoffman kind of being really anxious and pacing up and down and trying to get into the park and Olivia went up to him and said, Dustin, try acting, which Jans obvious. But the end of the day we're pretending to be someone else. Yeah, yes, we're trying to do it as accurately as possible, but if you're going to try and become that person, I think that's unnecessary. I saw that. Did you ever see that documentary or that film with Jim Carrey where he played and the Kaufman and mine on the Moon? You've you seen the dollmator? Yeah, I really really interesting documentary. Have to watch it and as on Netflix and Jim Carrey and bodies literally and the Kaufman. He became at the Coffman. Okay, did you know Mandy caught you and not on the Kaufman is? No, I don't know. He he's American. I think he's America, and he basically did a lot, lots of comedy and he was a very strange guy. But but anyway, Jim Carrie took on his character and Jim Carrey shows you, but this footage and a documentaryows you behind the scene footage of Jim Carrey and he's basically that character. When the camera stops, carries it on and he ends up pissing the people off, his working with the directors and he's he just literally just became that character. That's that's actually quite funny. A friend and a friend of mine is in the SCI FI show red dwarf and and yeah, he I don't know if you've ever watched red dwarf, but they have lots of very silly, silly characters turn up. Yeah, there was an every so where Elvis was for some reason. I'll elvis was in the episode. You know, it was an English bloke playing Elvis. So and my mate Chris said yes, so he was brilliant. You know, all morning he was ank. You very much, mail. Thank it. Okay, boy, being a Chris, they were in the lunch queue and the woman was like, you want chips with that, dear, but you're very much, ma'am, and he couldn't stop. had his lunch as Elvis. You know, he's from Milton Keynes or somewhere. Yeah, it's it's passing the thing to any one final acting story. Then we put a better stop and we yeah, it's fine. Yeah. Another friend of mine was in Captain Carelli's Mandolin, the movie right with Nicholas Cage. Is that right? Yeah, he played the lead into yeah, and...

...my mate had thought he was going on a flight to Greece on the Tuesday. Sunday night he went out with a loaded mate and got absolutely blotto and then at six o'clock on Monday morning that's doorbell rang and the Blake said I've come to take you to the airport and Martin's of what this Tuesday, and the books a no, no, no, your flight is in three hours time and we're late, so you better. We got and he didn't wash, she didn't cheat, slept in his clothes. He had no time to pack, and so you don't Greece, you know, stinking and and then the next day he went on set and Nicolas Cage came up and said, you are the one without the luggage, because he was doing exactly the same thing. He was. He was decided he was going to speak with an Italian accent for the whole shoot. Oh my God, there we go. That's insane. That's why saying are we yeah, that's good, as it's a wrap, as I call it. That's Oh, you make me feel so at home. Thank you. Yeah, but you cann language. Yeah, but not a patrick. It's it's a spears. been a pleasure of talking to you. Well, no, thank you. It's always fun to talk about oneself a long time, but not right. I really appreciate your time and it's been really great talking to you. You just is is there? Is there any usually ask us? Are you know lunes? I don't know. If you're social media like is, where can people find you got a website and if a people can find your content on or is IMDB the best source you? I think best thing to do is Google Patrick Kremin and then things will come up. There's a one of my scenes in east end is on Youtube. I know that. I think the STREP sells adds are on Youtube and my agents website and my and my spotlight and can be looked and my show real is on there. My Yeah, okay, I'll I'll put that in the description so people can find anyway. I'll find it's you send me some details. I'll to it. Okay, nice, one awesome right. Enjoy your Sunday lunch and speak too soon. Yeah, you too, Patriot. Take care. Okay, so, your mate, all the best. Tears Part.

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