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The Parrsitivity Podcast
The Parrsitivity Podcast

Episode 10 Β· 1 year ago

The Parrsitivity Podcast #Episode 92 Hala Taha (Young And Profiting Podcast)

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

In this podcast I'm joined by such a positive and driven person Instagram: @yapwithhala Hala is the host of one of the #number1 how to Podcast's on Apple (Young And Profiting) - In this podcast we talk about success, time management, side hustles, passion, taking action and much more! - go and check out the YAP Podcast πŸ‘‡ https://www.youtube.com/c/YoungandProfiting LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/htaha website: www.youngandprofiting.com --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/the-parrsitivity-podcast/message

Hither. My name is Adam Po and the podcast host posity to podcast. In this podcast, you will be listened to me connect with people from different walks of life, from the military to people in the music industry, to people in the self help industry and many other areas of life. In this podcast I'll be talking about topics from self help, mental health, motivation, spirituality, mindset, society, current affairs and much, much more. If you enjoy this podcast, please subscribe, share and let me know your feedback. And my main intention on this podcast is to have a positive impact for you, the lit the listener, to take something positive from it, to apply something positive into your life from this. Now with without further ado, let's go to podcast and enjoy. Hi, welcome to the positive podcast. In today's episode, I'm joined with ALATA. In today's episode we talked about motivation, mindset, time management, covid and really take an action and acting on things that you want to act on in life. Now, sit back, relax and enjoy this episode. Halloo, nice to have you on the podcast. Really appreciate your going on. Yeah, happy to be here. excited. Yeah, I know, I really really appreciate it because, yeah, I saw your sow your profile and I was like what are you don't like loads of different things, like you've got your own your own podcast, yeah, which is doing which is doing really well. Call young and profit. And then I thought you you've had your own blog, hmm, and you got scouted by MTV for that. Yeah, and you know, you work for Disney as well, so you've got an NBA as well. So you don't know the different things, which is like amazing. Yeah, what kind of got you into? Like it's the podcastings are so that you did about radio work as well. Yeah, so essentially I started young and profiting podcast to merge my bid business and broadcasting passions. So originally I started off in radio. When I was in college, I got an internship at hot and any seven. And for those of you, I think you're in the UK, so for those of you that don't know, hot and any seven is like the number one radio station in America and in New York for hip hop and rb and so when I was just in college I got an internship at that station and end up working myself up to be the top on Air Personalities Assistant, and so I was Angie Martinez's assistant and at the time I was working out hot any seven. I actually dropped out of school for a period of time and I worked there full time and I would also have online radio shows on the side and I would record commercials for the radio station. So I didn't have my own show on hot any seven, but I would...

...prepare all the research for Angie and she would interview like huge celebrities, Jlo, drake, beyonce and like. Those were the people I would be researching for her and helping her come up with her content, and then I would host online radio shows on the side with some of the younger DJ's. So a lot of the DJ's that are on that station now and are really big, those are like Dj Drew Ski Jijo Wantit to those are people that I used to have radio shows with and then now they like they stayed at Hound any seven and stayed on that path and I took a different path. So at some point, it's a really long story. We can get into it if you want. I left hot and any seven. I started a blog, I almost got a DV show and then I took a halt. Some some things didn't aligne right and I wanted to get an education, I got my Mba, I got a four point. No, I went into corporate and then five years it was a five year break from when I left the entertainment industry and just focused on my corpororate career. I took five years to really build my wealth, to build my skills to have a sustainable career, and then I launched young and profitting podcast as like my next forte into the entertainment world, and that was kind of a really quick success because I had so much experience from before that I brought into it and I kind of knew how to launch something from scratch and have it work, and I already had the broadcasting experiences. So it really makes my business and my broadcasting skills and I put out young and profiting podcast. Gosh, no, that's so awesome. Loved all that. Hold that different like experience, you know, like you know, doing your studies, you know, being on a radio show, working you way up, doing your blog. Yeah, man, like MTV, like scouting your blog, and you said I almost led to a TV show as well, which is yeah, yeah, crazy is and that would you think? You know, it will be different and kind of opportunities not going to rise and the and where a lot of take. She wasn't it? Yeah, it really is. It was awesome when MTV scouted us. We were so excited. It was they put a lot of money into us. They actually scouted US twice. So the first time it was when we first started and they were interested in putting together a pilot and so they just did like it was like two days of shooting and we didn't get the show. But it wasn't a big deal because it we just had started the blog and we already got like MDV trying to put us on a TV show, and we're like well, we'll just keep going because this was cool anyway. I no big deal. Then two years later they came back to us and were like this time we really want to do a show. They invested like hundreds of thousands of dollars. They got us a studio on Broadway. We shot for like a month and then we didn't get the show after all of that, and that actually is what triggered us to kind of take a break from we called it the Sorority of hiphop. We had. It was like a hip hop blog site and a radio show, and we decided we were going to take a break and kind of focus on ourselves rather than this sorority of hiphop, because we weren't able to really monetize the way that we wanted and we could have gotten a show on oxygen, we could have done other roots, but we were all like just kind of heartbroken from the MTV thing. At the time, MTV was like huge. Right now, I'm TV's not that big anymore, but at the time, this was like seven years ago or so, it was like right after Jersey shore had ended. That was a huge show on MTV, and it's like we were could have been the next Jersey shore, as we thought so, but it didn't happen. So we were a little bit crushed and then we kind of kept it. We all went our separate ways. It's something like sometimes I when things don't work out, I believe that, you know, sometimes I an oppens for a reason. Sometimes, unlike you, fought the experience and I think like okay, you know, maybe it wasn't meant to be. And Joe Lot, you know you want a different path now and you've probably, you know, grown in certain areas and opportunities of a risen, even though you didn't get that time TV position. Yeah, yeah, yeah, I totally agree. I think everything definitely happens for a reason. I think that I...

...was immature, I didn't really know how to lead properly and I think that once I actually got to step away, I was brought to be like such a young leader. I was like twenty five years old leading fifty women, and that was a lot of pressure, like, you know, like and and had all those girls looking at me too. They wanted to be famous, they wanted and like kind of writing on my coat tails. I was the one like building the websites and teaching. Everyone had a blog and and there were certain girls that are really good at like hosting parties and like doing that thing. But at the end of the day, was like me and like maybe like four other main girls, and then we had all these other girls underneath us, and which is like a lot of pressure, and I wasn't the best leader. I didn't have enough experience. So now I want a team of ten people and I feel like I'm a way better leader because I had that corporate experience and I got to learn from other like managers and learn about processes and learn about project management, and I had no idea about that. Before I was just kind of like shooting from the hip all the time, especially when I had that blog. I was just really good at marketing and and kind of just like parlaid this whole thing out of it. So, yeah, I think that everything definitely happens for a reason and I think that I was able to grow my skill set in different ways and then now, with young and proffitting, I get to connect the dots. I bring in all the marketing and blogging and and video editing, graphic design and web design even that I did when I was younger, when I had the block site, and I've merged it with knowing more about business and more knowing more about finance and knowing more about just life in general, and I've put together like a new product from stacking all these skills. And so I think it's really important to get different experiences and that's what I always try to do. I'm always looking for ways to learn. HMM, yeah, no'St that's routing, sparring. I find and really lot, you know, motivating to who you talk about that and I find that that's that's a radical point. You made a lot always looking for new ways to learn, because I think some people are afraid to step out the comfort zone. The Not Willing To, you know, learn these things. They yeah, they don't there. Some people don't know what route to take and you've just kind of just jumped into it. Yeah, so I'm never like afraid to learn new things. Nowadays, everything is available on Youtube. I learned how to build websites by myself. I learned graphic designed by myself, I learned how to launch a podcast by myself. Everything is there. If you want to look for it. You can go ahead and take an online course or you can just google and piece things out together. And I would just talking to like a number one podcast or on my podcast. Her name is Cathie Heller. She hosts a podcast called don't keep your day job and she's like a millionaire. She literally has like a number one podcast on apple. She is like I have a big podcast. Her podcast is ten times bigger than mine and she always says, like just start messy, you don't need to be perfect, start messy, and like that's what I think. People are really afraid of just getting started. They're afraid of failing, and it's okay to just start somewhere. If you start a podcast, your first episode is probably going to suck, but then you'll get better and better. Whatever you're trying to learn. You just have to start. Put something on the table and you know, if you're scared, a trick that I like to use is do it for ten minutes. Do it for ten minutes and after ten minutes it will start to feel more comfortable and not so scary. You might end up doing it for a few hours. So if it's a matter of learning a new skill, try to just look at online videos for ten minutes. You know, give it a shot and see and see how it goes. So I think people are really scared of learning. A lot of people also think that they're too old to learn something new, but you've got to realize that you're never too old to learn something new. You know, learning has no age. HMM, yeah, Nastas severally good point. Like I think as well. Black people sometimes compare this. So it was just to what would people to do in public as well? How over, people's podcasts on the my think...

...a lot my love very good, you know, because I look with that person's up and it's not whatever wants to saw from somewhere down. I like you said, and there's no specific limit on age still be from doing it. Yeah, yeah, for sure. I mean it's just a matter of if you if it aligns with your values and it's something that you want to do, it shouldn't necessarily matter how many people are going to find it right away. If you're helping people, you will find an audience that is willing to receive that information. So it's like, as long as you're providing value and you feel that you have an audience that could learn from you in any way or learn from the guests that you have on your show, there's no reason why you shouldn't start a podcast, especially if you look at it, all the top podcasters, they actually aren't celebrities. Most of the celebrities that launch podcasts they don't really get anywhere because people aren't interested to just hear like the same regurgitated news that they hear on TV on a podcast. It's not how it works. They also might not want to hear from a celebrity on a podcast. They want to hear from regular people who start their own thing, who have an opinion or perspective, and so I definitely think that anybody who's looking to start a podcast. You know, there's plenty of room for everyone, and podcasting is really about going deep with your audience rather than going wide. So it's not really about the amount of people that you reach. It's how deep you go with the people that are your audience or people who have podcasts and who have careers off their podcast that get two hundred downloads an episode and they build their whole career around two hundred downloads an episode. You don't need millions of downloads to be successful podcaster. So that's definitely something to think about. HMM. Yeah, now it's definitely a key isn't it? But you said it's not about how, why did you go? It's about, I'll kind of light you know, keep you go, the topics and what you talk about, isn't it? I suppose? Yea, and also just like connecting with your audience and getting to know them, getting to know them on a one on one basis, having a conversation with them, knowing what your listeners do for a living, and then they'll start to reciprocate and they'll start to trust you and they'll buy from you, you know. So it's like you don't need ten million clients you might need a hundred of clients. So how do you get like a hundred people to listen to your podcasts and want to buy from me? Right, that's all you need. Yeah, and, like you said, it's not about providing value, isn't it, to the audience? And I think that's that's one of the things that's key, isn't it? You, it's not about you and yourself, you know, getting a lot recognized, is it's some I've seen some people's PODCASTS and they'll go on about, you know, subscribes to scribe, pay for this, pay for this. Yeah, you know, if you'll, you'll provide and buy its people and it takes some from from it. I think that's very key, isn't it? And I bet if you, if you have people on your podcast who probably gone on to do their own podcast or you've like inspired people to like do podcasting, because I know a few people have been on mine or I know people who who I know and then they gone and done their own. Yeah, I mean, I not too much. I actually have pretty big guests on my podcast. So they either already have their podcasts are like they're doing like, you know, their best selling author, they're a billionaire like CEOS, that they're not really like starting their own podcast because of me, but I definitely influence a ton of listeners and a ton of my linkedin following to start their own podcast. M Yeah, now, I really like your podcast. I was watching it, I was watching a few episodes earlier, and yet that Evan Call Michael Ivan calm. Yeah, he's Great. Yeah, I've seen, I think I've seen some of this quotes. He's got a book, as me. He's got a youtube channel. He's like a number one youtube where he's got like over a couple, like three million subscribers on youtube, so he's really being on Youtube. And then the yeah, he does have a blog and I think he has a podcast to I can't remember if he has a pod. Yes, yeah, now you. I really like what your podcast is about and it's really like positive and lot uplifting, and you got somebody like varied people on...

...there as well, like doctors, you know, authors. So my podcast is all about helping people grow financially and professionally, no matter what age or industry they're in. I have, like I mentioned, best selling author, CEOS, billionaires, really high caliber, how high caliber guests. I like to a really proud of the guests that I've secured on my show. Mark Manson, Robert Green, Jim Mckelvey's and Fifer like. These are huge names, especially in the business world, and so I've able to been secure, to secure them on my show and basically try to pull out actionable advice that can help people in there, you know, business or personal. I A point. Yeah, Nice, it's keys now. I mean, I think, like you know, to I find podcasting amazing and like connecting with people and I find that you learn so much about yourself as well by doing by about other people and seeing all the people's perspectives. And I thought as well, because I did over lockdown, you know, since the pandemic, I used to do like, you know, one a week or something like that, and I just want to do it my call. So I just started doing that. That's what I do. That's why I do it from because it's, you know, pretty quiet and yeah, I always like to hit the ground running and get things right where it's a process, is podcasting is. It's a process. HMM. Do you have a question about that? Like what? Yeah, it was what my processes? Yeah, yeah, did you did you think that it would take off, because it's only life set buck. So like thing that you you show, would we when you do? When you did it? Yeah, so when I first started, I was by myself, I didn't have a team and I started off with like a really complex format. So when I first started off, I would interview like three or four guests at a time, then I would chop up their audio, piece it all together and like narrate in between, and so it was very complex and it would take me like a whole month to put out an episode. And if you're a podcast or you may know that if you want to keep the momentum, you need to put out at least one episode week. You really should be putting out two to three episodes a week if you want to keep the momentum. And so for me, I obviously when I first started I wasn't doing very well. You know, my friends and manily would listen to my podcast probably compared to most people's podcast launch, just because I had like a decent following, it did pretty well, but for my standards and for me having such a big like blog in the past and everything, I wasn't really like this is not working right. I need to do something different. So then I changed my format to be more simple. I just do like a one on one interview. I do a lot of upfront research and work. I, you know, outline all my questions, I know the flow of my show. I do a lot of upfront work so that when I do have the episode, I know exactly what I'm trying to get out of my guest and so that I know I'll put on a great show without necessarily so much post production. And so I feel like I still have quality content, but it's still a lot less work, because before I kind of was just interviewing so many people and then I had to connect the dots and think about what did this person say that relates to this and like can I just and it was just like a lot of work. So now, literally, I am kind of a pro at interviewing people at this point where the video is barely edited and then uploaded, and same with the audio. It's like putting the Intro, the outro and like everything else is kind of just done already because I've done so much upfront work to study my guest, to come up with great questions to get value out of the episode. So the process I have a very complex process when it comes to securing gas. When it comes to writing my script, like my research. Nothing scripted, but I do have questions in advance and things like that. Yeah, not as great, and I think like it's so important, isn't it's a lot be prepared on the aspect and do that research, you know,...

...because I do a bit of research and as well, and I'll made lot bullet points. I'm when I first started doing all that, I never used to do so just I've into it and I of those lot. You know, I need to start researching because but I find that sometimes people I've done some podcast with I've just free flowed and not hards any bullet points and it's kind of gone quite well. But I think it depends who though it's. Sometimes, yeah, I think. I think it just depends on your style. I think everybody has a different style. For me, my podcast like isn't about myself. It's really about trying to get an expert. I have people that are like really busy and it would be like offensive if I didn't know about that, if I was just like hey, like so, who are you? You know, and like that wouldn't fly in my world. You know, it's like I need to show my guests like respect. I have people who are probably get paid tenzero dollars for an hour and I'm taking that hour from that from them. I better know about their lives and for me, I try to make sure that I'm getting like the best thing out of my guests that my audience would want to hear, not something like that they could hear on any other podcasts, going deeper on specific topics, but also making sure that I get like that piece of information that I know will help my audience so much, and so that's why I do my research. But I think everybody has a different show format. For me, my show is really educational. It's not just like shooting the Shit, like yeah, what's that famous podcast or I can't even remember his name, but he's the biggest one, Joe Rogan. Yeah, it's like that's not my show. My show is like really educational and you know about like getting rich and and having like a profitable life, both both personally and professionally. So I really just try to get educational value out of my guests and that definitely takes up front research, but to each their own. I think everybody has their own style, right. Yeah, no, I agree with us, and you could to be your solf having to you thought. You you call and try and be like you have to be yourself. It's more like coal forensic style. But would you? Would you? Who just say a lot your role models all? Yeah, I mean in the podcasting where old I definitely look up to Jordan Harbinger. So he was actually on my show. He's one of the top podcasters. He used to be on the art of charm and then he left that show and started the Jordan Harbinger show and it's been going really well. He's so smart. So, like, I love learning from him. He's become like sort of a mentor. So Jordan Harbinger, for sure. Evan Carmichael's a really big support to the best thing about podcasting is that these guests end up turning into mentors, into clients, into just great connections to have, and so one of the reasons why I started a podcast is actually to be able to talk to people that otherwise wouldn't have given me the time of day. So now I can approach Jordan Harbinger, who's a top podcaster, and pick his brain for an hour and ask him questions that I'm interested in learning, and then I keep that relationship and introduce him to my other friends and people who can help him and we have a mutually beneficial relationship. Then I've like expanded my network with like such highly influential people. It's amazing. So like's like that's one of the best reasons to start a podcast is to actually make relationships with people who otherwise would not have the time for you. Yeah, yeah, no, I I completely agree. Like, I think, like you make so many connections, done you, and I think that's that's what one of the politicians for it, because you kind of you know, you could become friends and to build this yeah, those connections that you make, you know the people might then connects with that and I just kind of go from there. Yeah, I mean like, like I said, some of the people that I've interviewed, Jordan, Paris, Mark metry Quentin alums, those are my friends. They're like my friends...

...and people who we support each other on social media, we throw each other opportunities, we look out for each other friends. Then I have other people like Heather Monahan. Now she's a client. Right. Then I have other people like Jordan Rvinger, Christopher Voss. Now they're mentors, you know. So it's like everybody kind of has their own place and like you start to build a really valuable network. It's very cool. Yeah, no, it's really it's really in spine when you know what you've done and you know what you've built, and I think like all the experience that you kind of like hots is kind of old conic comes together, it doesn't it. So what? Yeah, so I talked about this concept called skill stacking and I think that's really important for everybody to understand. So I had this guy, his name is Scott Adams, and he introduced me to this concept of skill stacking. He was on my podcast and he's like a world famous cartoonist. Have you ever heard of the cartoon called Dilbert? It's a mare like that. It it's like a little guy with like funny hair and he's like in the business setting and he's always yeah and like. So it's very fam it's like one of the biggest syndicated in like fifth across fifty countries. Like all this like is a huge cartoon. Right. So this guy, he talks about skill stacking and it's because he was in the business world. He wasn't the best drawer, he was he was funny. He wasn't the best writer and he so he knew business, he was a good drawer, he was a decent writer and then he started this cartoon and became number one, biggest cartoon in the world, right, other than like this Newpian cartoon. So yeah, so it's like it. It's a comic. Sorry, it's a comic, like one of those comics. And that's what skill stacking is. It's being good at many things and putting them together. So for me, I'm a good blogger, I'm a good graphic designer, I'm a good video editor, I'm a good honor personality. You put that together and you have young and profiting podcast. I'm probably not the best podcaster in the world, but I'm a really good marketer. And so me being a great podcaster, a phenomenal marketer, you know, a good writer, which is great for social media, putting that all together and then putting out the podcast, I stand out because I might, like graphic design skill, stand out amongst the other podcasters. Nobody has like cool artwork like I do, were a lot of people don't. And then also my networking skills. I'm really great at connecting and and impressing really highly influential people, and so they agree to come on my show. You know I'm really I took a lot of actions. So it's like putting all these skills together, you have your unique value proposition that you offer to the world and you can, you know, be really successful by doing that. A lot lot of people. The whole point in this is that you don't need to be a specialist. A lot of people think I need to be the best podcaster and if I'm just about best podcaster, I will be successful, and it's like, that's not how it works. There's so many great podcasters that are probably a podcaster that's way better than me, but gets now downloads because they don't know how to market their stuff right and they don't have that piece of it, or they didn't outsource it, or they don't take enough action or they think, you know what I mean. Like there could be a million things. You need to put together a unique offering, whatever field that you're in, and you can take different skills from different experiences and layer them on top of each other. So that's why having experience it's so important because you want to be unique. You don't want to just be a specialist. That it was one thing, because you need multiple layers of experiences and skills in order to be successful, and it's just everybody's a little bit different in terms of their skill set and skill stack. HMM, no, that's that's that, and I think, like you said, with what you do, you you know, just doing the podcast. You're like, you know, you're marketing at your good and connections, networking, you know how you outsource it. You know the videos, all the content, and some people just do the podcast and they don't really know how to do all the rest or they might pay people to then do all those bits fall them. Yeah, I was like, you're just like, you...

...know, doing all of it and you just exactly, and I'm able to like exactly, and I think I've been able to scale because I basically do it and then train my team to replicate it, and now I'm doing that for clients. So it's like it's like it's very cool. Yeah, I know, I bet it's really rewarding. You know what you do as well. You know, seeing, seeing what you know, process all that and on the phone, was it what were going out and the whole all the Inter connections of building it. Yeah, for sure. I mean it's amazing. I love working on the podcast. It's something I'm so passionate about. I have an amazing team and it's all about building proper processes, being organized, having a brand, a vision of voice and and just like repeating it so that you can scale. Yeah, yeah, I'm solidly. Did you have any favorite books? It's all that you lot to read these days. I don't have that much time, so I think a lot of research for my guests. So I typically read the books preparing for my guests. So I just read don't Keep Your Day job by Kathy Hillary. It was amazing and I usually read the books that of the people who are coming on my show. So I can't say that I have like a favorite book. My favorite, I say, I can't say a favorite recent book. My favorite book of all time is the like switch by Dr Jack Shaffer. He is an x FBI agent. He was my first guest on young I'm profiting podcast and I actually reached out to him because it was my favorite book and I told them, like you know, as a favorite book, I really listen to it like ten times already. I would love if you could come on my show, and he agreed. So that's another thing that you guys should take away from this is, like you don't get anything if you don't ask for it. And something that I'm really good at, and I think the reason why I've achieved a lot of success and all my different endeavors that I've done is because I ask. I I'm not afraid to ask. I'm not afraid to get a rejected in any situation. Rejection is just a redirection and you don't need to be afraid of being rejected and you've got to ask. You've got to ask for what you want. HMM. Yeah, also really good point. I think, like we've got like not being afraid to ask. I think a lot of people, you know, afraid to ask and a lot of people sometimes talk themselves out doing something before they've even done it, like, you know, yeah, for like my maybe limits of belief or because they might about somebody's one time I didn't work out, so then the thing all, I didn't work out. It's a wash. Bask again. Yeah, I mean it's just it depends on what you're talking about specifically. I think something that when you're if you're looking to launch a business or a product, the best thing that you can do before you go out is think about what people ask you for already. If people are like for me, everyone is always asking me, how do I build a linkedin following, how do I launch a podcast? So what am I going to do as soon as I am not working full time anymore? I am and I'm already starting it. I'm going to have a podcast marketing business. I'm going to want help people how to launch their help people launch or podcast, because that's what people are asking me for. The other thing that you want to do is ask people what they want. So not only asking them do you want to buy from me, or asking them do you want to do this for me, it's how can I help you? What do you need help with, and then design your offering around what they actually want. People want to be heard, you know, and people don't want to be sold to, they want to be listened to, and so that's, I think, very key. If you're somebody who is trying something new, you're afraid of being rejected, ask people what they want and then you won't get rejected because you'll literally, literally be giving them what they asked for right, and so there won't be any rejection and then, in general, just about any life opportunities. You just got to get over it. You've got to get over people saying no, people ignoring you. It doesn't matter. If you shoot out sixty messages and ten people get back to you, you've won and you do haven't lost anything. You've lost a little bit of time messaging those people and...

...most of the time it will be copy and pay slightly customized messages. When I ask guests to be on my show, seven percent of the time they say no or they don't respond, but then thirty percent of the time they say yes and I shoot for the stars, and so I have thirty percent of the stars that I requested. You know, and says I. You just have to ask and you have to have also, like a quality product. You have to have like. You can't just like talk to talk. You've got to walk the walk. If I didn't have great quality show and I didn't prepare for my show, nobody would come on. But I've been able to cure high caliber guests from day one and then I put on a quality show, I promote it so it's worth their time and then I keep asking more people to come on my show. So it's really about making sure that, a you ask and you're not afraid to ask and be you can stand behind your word and have people respect and trust what you do. M Yeah, Nice, that's it as uply. Yeah, and I you know, I applad you for what you doing. I mean I think it's really, really great what you're doing and the content that you may and content you put out there now you welcome, and that work effort you have in that drive to just do it and see it through and to succeed and, you know, to just keep going. I mean it's yeah, you know, it's really insparring and I think like that's that's the thing. You know, was taking your ties, your time. Isn't it putting your time out provide and value to to the wile person? Yeah, definitely. And I think something else, since you brought up time. A lot of people have the excuse of resources. Right. So resources can be money, resources can be time. A lot of people complain that they don't have time to anything to do, they don't have time for anything that they want to do. So let me tell you everything that I'm doing right now. I have a podcast. It's a number one how to podcast. I have a full time job at Disney streaming services as a very are demanding job that I have to do every day from nine to six. Right I have a boyfriend and I have to cook them dinner every day and I've take care of the house or whatever. Right I also have a clients, potentially three new clients, but right now I have one client, Heather Monahan, that I do all of her marketing for. I also have a freelance project where I'm doing email marketing for an agency and I'm doing that on the side. So look at all these things that I'm doing. I'm generating multiple income streams. I have two full time jobs, basically with Disney on my podcast. Those are two full time jobs. I have to side hustles on top of that and I'm taking I'm seeing my friends, I'm working out, I'm having fun, I'm watching movies, I'm still living a life. And why? It's because I'm choosing the way that I spend my time. I'm not doing dumb stuff with my time. I'm not binge watching ten hours of TV every night. I'm not doing that. I decided I'm not going to watch TV. Instead, I'm going to have a podcast. Literally, like the time that people spend watching TV, you could have a podcast or you could have some sort of hobby or side hustle. You just not doing it because you didn't prioritize it. And so that's really key and it's like when I was now it's covid. I've liked. The reason why I'm able to literally take on another side project like that agency project is because I I gained two hours of my day. I used to have a forty five minute commute each way to New York City. I live in Brooklyn and and I could only do stuff on my phone on the commute. I couldn't be that productive. Now I have had two extra hours a day and I can do other stuff. COVID is the perfect time to take on a sad housto because you can't do anything like. You can't really do like I can't go to the beach right now. I would probably be at the beach if this was last summer. So what am I doing? I'm doing a podcast interview with you. Before this I was getting another client. Before this, I like you know, after this I have a...

...meeting with my web editor. It's like I'm working on a Saturday because I know I want to be super successful and I will take the time and I will make the time to do the things that I need to do to take myself forward. And I think that people make a lot of excuses in regards to time. We all have the same twenty four hours a day. That's a hundred and sixty eight hours a week. If you work sixty hours, if you work sixty hours a week, you have like all and like you sleep eight hours a day, you're left with like sixty hours left to do anything that you want side Hustle, podcast, work out, family time. You have a lot of time. People waste their time on social media. Peace to waste their time on TV, and so people use as as an excuse. It's not an excuse. And then the second thing that people use an excuse is lack of resources in terms of money, and that's also an excuse. It's actually an advantage to be resourceful. So it's like a lot of the things that I did with my podcast cost no money. Shooting somebody in email and finding their email dress cost no money. Creating a social media post costs no money. I greeted K followers on Linkedin and generated that many followers and like a year. That cost no money other than like eventually I started getting a video editor and that happen all later and my best videos are, you know, selfie videos I took on my phone for five minutes. Right. So it's really all about your action and your willingness to be creative. If you're not willing to be creative, then you're not going to get anywhere. And you could have all the resources in the world, you can have all the money, all the time in the world. If you're not creative, you're just going to be like everybody else. And so it's like it's just a matter of being resourceful, being creative and having the drive to actually go do what you're seeking to do. I Love the love way you put it. It's just so true, isn't it? It's just so true. And it's like people, people have excuses as to why they haven't got things and why they're not you know, and some positions out the wish to be. Like you said, it's all these excuses and we all have everything within us to get the things that we want. But yeah, we just, like you said, a matter privatizing your time and having that choice. And I you said you're doing all these different things. You know, you're working a job, you have a partner, you're doing the podcast, you know, you got mock in someone's content. You don't all these different things. And how do you again, Sol I'm in my early thirty S. yeah, and, like you know, you'll you, frozis you doing all these different things on like people? You know? Yeah, I haven't got an excuse to lot and not do something. Like you said, people spend too much time, wasting it and not thinking about that time. I find, and I said, watching TV too much, and we will like Wort TV and so some phone. Yeah, yeah, I mean, people really waste our time scrolling through social media, watching TV. The best thing that you could do is start to track where you're spending your time. Some people just like spend too much time in the shower, like my boyfriend. Sometimes it was a two hour showers. He's super successfully doesn't need to worry about it. But like some people spend two hours in the shower. You know, is that really necessary? What could you be doing with that time that's more productive? If that's your goal, maybe your goal is you want to relax in the shower, you know, and so that's cool. Spend your time that way. But there's everybody waste their time differently and everybody has different goals. For me, right now, my goal is to be very successful so that I can set myself up in the future and I'll just be good, you know. I really feel that like in the next year I'll be have a course in generating passive income and like really be able to have kids and spend time with them, you know, and like that's my goal and I don't know what everybody else's goals are, but if you do have specific goals that you need to make time for, you have the time. Elon Musk has the same time as you, Jeff BESOS has the same amount of time as you. You can make the time. You can figure out how...

...to work smarter, you can figure out what's your highest priority tasks are and focus on them and move the needle and it is possible and people are just scared. So it's like sometimes it's actually like a mental shift you have to take before the action, and it just might be that you don't believe in yourself and if you don't believe in yourself. You've got to do that work, whether it's with a therapist, whether it's looking at self improvement videos, to start realizing like why don't I believe in myself? Why don't I ever take action? Why don't I ever do what I say I'm going to do and then figure out what that I can't think of the word, like, what that trauma is inside of you and heal it and then do something. HMM, yeah, not exactly exactly right. I understand, believe what you said and your part of my watching a film in the shower. You have two hour shows us and we want to move sarious. Yeah, I don't know. One of my rights is that. Sometimes I had a shower and as all, I pad out, so I'll just sit there. But it's what it's. Whatever works for you, isn't it's not balanced, just not balance the end the day, like I playstation of the weekend of my friends, you know, any do with the weekend. You know, I'll I watch movies, but it's on the weekend. You know, it's like I still have fun, it's just that right now and my ties, I had a lot of fun. So it's like I was like this party girl like whatever. I used to host parties, that was what I did for my job, you know, and so it's like I had a lot of fun and but now I'm all about work and it just really about your parties. But if you're ready to really buckle down and be productive, it's possible. You just have to get into that mental state and you have to be able to be organized and kind of think about how you want to spend your time and be intentional about the way that you spend your time. Yeah, I couldn't agree more. I couldn't be offen. You put it a Nune on a thing like as what with what you said. You're Taln you know, you're think about the future. You think about the future and where you want to be, what you want to be doing. Nothing. Sometimes people don't do though. They don't think the future. The too still going to now, to sticking to now. Then I'll think about the next day or the next week. So they just doing the just doing. Yeah, like so it's so boring. Yeah, I mean, I agree. I think I'm not the type of person that, like I wanted, you like, have these specific concrete goals, but I do take actions that will keep progressing me and I do switch it up all the time. I don't just do the same thing and expect the same results. That's what insanity is, right. So it's like, if I'm not getting results at try something new. If I'm not getting results, I try something new and then that gets me to the next level and I'm not get and then I keep trying something new until it works, and then I stick with that and then it stops working. Then I think of something new and like. So it's just like it's just a matter of what your goals are. And then also, it's not necessarily having concrete goals, but it's taking actions that keep moving the needle every day. I know I don't necessarily know what I want to be in five years or what I think I'm going to like. I've no idea, but I know how I can make money tomorrow. I know how I can make money next week, you know, and so I do the things that will help me generate that income, help me secure that client, and it's like, I'm not going to be doing podcast marketing five years from now, but I definitely can make money on it right now, so I'm just going to do it. You know, I'm just going to do it and in five years, like the next time I'm like, Oh, I feel like I can make money doing this, then I'm just going to do that, you know. And it's not about having some concrete goal. I think there's lots of ways to achieve success. You just have to kind of like lean into what's working, and so that's what I do. I just kind of see what's working, you know, and then just lean into that. For I'll give it an example, just on social media. When I first started my podcast, I was posting on Linkedin, instagram equally, and then Linkedin was like obviously working and I was like I'm going to put all my chips on Linkedin, and now I'm one of the top podcasters on Linkedin. Had I've been stretching myself then keep trying to do instagram even though it's not working, then...

I would have never gotten anywhere. And so it's really smart to just like lean into what works. No matter what the scenario is. It's always better to like kind of just go with the flow, and so, like that's what I was saying before about think about what people are asking of you. Everybody is asking me for podcast marketing right so that's what I'm going to start offering, because everybody's asking me the same questions, right, and so if you're getting asked the same questions, obviously there's a demand. And I'm not even trying to get clients and I have clients like like lined up and I didn't even try and it's just it's just a matter of thinking about, like, what are you good at, instead of trying to force something down somebody's throat, think about what people ask of you, like what do people say, like your coworkers? What do they say about you in terms of like how you like? What are your most helpful characteristics that you can monetize? HMM, yeah, yeah, yeah, that's that's it. That's actly, isn't it? And it's going. It's going to what suits you, isn't it's going to what works for you. Yeah, I just go with the flow and and stick with what works and keep I keep iterating and experimenting and seeing what's working. Like what I never do the same thing for for very long. I'm always experimenting and just seeing what works and just getting a little bit closer and closer and closer to my dreams. M Yeah, I know, I think I think you do an amazing and what you're doing, you know, and it's ruling spaw and talking to you about all these different projects that you're working on and you know how you progressed and you know your work ethic and your mindset behind everything. I think, you know, it's really really you know, provides value to two of those and you know, if you're doing a great job and, like you know, it encourage other people to, you know, get open do something. Yeah, I hope I encourage everybody. And you know, if you find me on Linkedin, I'm at Hallida Aha and I always post inspirational content on there. I'd love for your listeners to follow me on there. And, of course, my podcast, young and profiting. We're always interviewing the brightest minds in the world, so lots of value there. The podcast is not about me at all. It's all about the expertise that my guests have in their mind that I try to bring out for you all. Yeah's awesome. That's awesome thing, like you know, with what you're doing as well. It's it's so positive and it's, you know, I think it's very much needed. You know, in Tim's what's been happening as well. I think you know, a lot of people can take a lot from it and in the wood in your work that you done, for sure. Yeah, I mean I do this really for my listeners. I don't make much money off my podcast. It's really to help people and my favorite thing is to get a review on Apple podcast where somebody says that I like change their life or that they listen every day and and and it just helps them or help them launch a podcast or start a business. and to me that's like the biggest reward, is just to have my listeners find value of my content and take action based on the content that I provide. So that's like the biggest blessing in the world and I feel that the world is reciprocative of what you put out and so I feel like I put out value and content and I get so much opportunity back at me for doing good for the world. So it's very fulfilling. Yeah, it's really great and I think like it's a definitely that young and young, isn't it? You know what you could value, you get back totally completely. But but nice piece. been great talking to you tall. It really, really has, really, really thunk you for coming on the podcast. I'm really appreciate you responding to me. Yeah, and the emailing really means a lot, of course. Well, I hope wish you luck on your podcasting journey. Kudis to you for doing your episode in your car. That shows a lot of grits and that you're taking it seriously, so I'm really...

...proud of you. You probably don't have a quiet please at home and so you just doing it in your car. That's the type of thing that I'm talking about when it comes to creativity. That's creative, you know, like you could have just been like, you know what, I have no place to record, but you're like, I'll just do it in my car, like that's being creative and that's what's going to get you to the next level. Funk you, funk. You to all probably appreciate it. Thanks. Thanks, Adam. Yeah, take care of a nice day. Hold the best. You too, see little to.

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