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The Parrsitivity Podcast
The Parrsitivity Podcast

Episode 8 · 1 year ago

The Parrsitivity Podcast #Episode 94 Gillian Seale

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Gillian Seale is an entrepreneur, Tedx speaker and author! Preserving family memories for children who’s parents are battling with terminal illness by creating a literature legacy in the form of beautifully illustrated bespoke books and TEDx Speaker LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/gillian-seale Tedx video: https://www.linkedin.com/posts/gillian-seale_bespoke-books-and-the-healing-of-a-shattered-activity-6653551125775556608-tWE4 --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/the-parrsitivity-podcast/message

Hither. My name is Adam Po and the podcast host posity to podcast. In this podcast, you will be listening to me connect with people from different walks of life, from the military to people in the music industry, to people in the self help industry and many other areas of life. In this podcast I'll be talking about topics from self help, mental health, motivation, spirituality, mindset, society, current affairs and much, much more. If you enjoy this podcast, please subscribe, share and let me know your feedback. And my main intention on this podcast is to have a positive impact for you, the lit the listener, to take something positive from it, to apply something positive into your life from this. Now with without further ado, let's go to podcast and enjoy. Hi, welcomes the pose is a podcast. In today's episode, I'm joined by Jillian Seale. She is a telex speaker and author. She's an author that preserves family memories for children whose parents are battling terminal illnesses by creating a literature legacy in the form of beautiful illustrated bespoke box in this podcast, we talked about the work that Julian seal does in terms of her books, the illustrations and difference that she makes and the journey in the process of being an entrepreneur. Now, sit back, black's and enjoy this episode actually. And how are your I thank you, Adams. Can you hit me right? I can hear you find. I'm so sorry. When you said thirty minutes of thought. He's not quite radiance minutes even. It's absolutely fun, I said. I looked and I was like, AH, don't really explain up they could be. Could it as a lot of thirty minutes? Okay, or yeah, that's all right. It's okay nowice, but not. Fuck you. Thank you. Come on the PODCAST. So we really appreciate it. No, no, that's fine. That's fine. Yeah, because we spoke, I think like last week and kind of like touch base and yeah, I just thought I'd like, you know, kind of start off by kind of, you know, asking how you got into what you do, because you're by you basically you did a Ted talk, like public speaking event, where you basically spoke about like the project that you're working on and things you've been working on. Yeah, yeah, I says, talking about really because it's something different nobody's come across before...

...and people haven't thought of Theod idea and of people like into legacy using fictional books to do that. Yeah, just having it trying to explain that and top about different projects, like you say, a few different book projects I'm working on the moment. So, yeah, yeah, no, sorry, I'm yeah, so the first book as talking about, was the postis missing. That too, which is the one that I wrote for close friends, got mustly this free. And yeah, it was just feeling inspired by her because of the journeys that she has been on and I think when you've got some of disability but you don't have it recognized or diagnosed, she found hard liking in school when it came to pe. People would sort of think that she was just really slowed. They didn't want her on a team and I think it's very discouraging. Yeah, and just sort of the way in which you can put that kind of challenge into a fictional book, where a character might be struggling but but too scared to admitted to all of her friends. But when they and people might have have much empathy until they realize actually, this is something she's trying your best. You're actually she's not. You know, she's not been lazy and she's not been. She's not getting distracted. It's genuinely it's a physical struggling with being fast and strong like the rest of a friend. So yeah, yeah, so the book, my friend wanted to be all about the pining one another because she feels that in this world were told to be so independent all time, but actually it's so important to real that you can depend on other people and friends and you can support each other in different ways, and so all of that was built into the different characters in the things that they do to help each other along the journeys. That's really lovelier and I think like it's a really positive thing that you've been doing, and I remember you saying when we prove spoke, that you you create these books to to explain to you know, younger children, you know what's been happening and you kind of put in events and life events that have happened maybe to you know, their relatives or a relatives or people who've been suffering with something. You put that kind of context into our box to kind of break it down and simple terms. Yeah, I think that's what I kind of like the most about what I'm trying to do in terms of creating these stories because I kind of want the essence of something that's really experienced in real life to put it into fiction in an interesting way, and I've done it in a few different ways in the book that I have done in the Pixie book. I've written about Dyslexia, which is a challenge that I've had personally, which meant that I never thought I'd ever be an author. That's the last thing I've expected to be. It's I use that in the in the character of a fairy who got her his spells modeled up. So everything you try to do with good intentions end up being catastrophically wrong because he just mix up his words and things, and I do think that in life you can be more challenging when you got flexy in the way that you interpret stuff that you're reading or takes you long to do things, things like that. So I put that into the store a little bit. And there's also one of the characters get, because it's all got a lot of magic. It to do with the pixies. When the characters get a moddy thoughts, they'll put on it a little shoe, get the muddy faults bill and starts acting really bizarre randomly starts disinterpreting things and act the health of character, and it's one of the funniest chapters in the book. It really is lays and I enjoyed writing the most because actually I could draw my own experience basis, because I feel that when you have something like psychosis, you can often you get delusions and you you misinterpret your own thoughts. I think throughout my life I've always been able to rely and trust in your thoughts, like everybody else. But when you become unwell to sleep deprivation and stress and other issues, you...

...actually get fooled into thinking that what you believe is true when actually it's completely not. So Yeah, hallucinations and delusions coming. So, but I just made that into comical aspect of the book. I'm thinking a serious thing with it. I've just made it very comical. The characters all sorts of funny things and then they nurse it better. So they make sure they get mid them to make the Moody faults they'll get away. So yeah, Nice. That's really like a you know, lovely, you know kind of way you've putting it, isn't it like taking something that you know you might have gone through in your life for you know, something that many, many other people, you know experience and putting that context somewhat into you know, picture book is, you know, really nice and I think like I'm and you saying like no know what, no one else has done that before. No one else has done what this this project that you're doing, and especially you touch on the topic psychosis sometime. You saying people can get it through childbirth and it's very, very rare and not many people know, no much about it. Yeah, that's true, Adam, because I never had any experience of any mental health issues, of problems until childbirth and I think that people perhaps don't mention it at Rintin eating antenatal classes or anything. They mentioned you might have depression, you might get anxiety post natally, but nobody mentioned the psychosis element. I think they're either scared to or because it's so rare, they think it's never going to happen. The theyn't want to frighten new mothers, but in all allnest the in truth bys them. I think if you actually warned people about it or just mentioned it as a yes, it's rare, but it could potentially happen. If you don't get as sleep. Then other parents, you know your husband's, might be able to notice if you're not behaving right and they might think, actually, perhaps my wife hasn't Haden a sleep. Perhaps we need to just get the doctor in check, or they could help get help much sooner because they know about it, because nobody my entire family had heard of it and so they are completely shocked when I suddenly went into hospital. Would need the problems. So it's it can happen, but I think if people know about it, and that's why trying to spread awareness of it, I think the farm more like to catch it earlier and get professional help and then you were much recovery is much easier after that point what you've got medication, professionals helping you. It's much easier. But if it's it's left undetected for too long, that's when it does get more difficulty. Yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah, it's very rare, like you said, but it's I've worked for charging now action on postparting psychosis for maybe five years or so and we're all volunteers, but we like to meet up and we like to help educate and do training with the midwives and things just to sort of help help their awareness. So yeah, now that's really positive and I think, like what you said, it's understanding, it isn't it? You know, like too many corporate you know, too many people or places kind of judge and kind of don't take a minute to take a step back and try and understand what our persons going through, what it is that's going on and to do a bit of research. Yes, actually funny enough that you mentioned researched, Adam, because as part of my psychology masters with Chess University, I'm doing it to take and I'm going to I'm basing it on mother's relapse and recovery during the recovery of postparting psychosis. So trying to look at people journey of recovery, but what support they get and when things can go wrong in terms of what other factors might contribute to you problems. Lay it down the line. Even if you don't have any more children, I think your mind's quite fragile. So that's happened to you before. It...

...could potentially happen again under maybe similar stressful circumstances. Way Again, you're not sleeping or that thing, and I think professionals now do tend to work with you longer to make sure you continue to stay with the period of have them many years that follow. They just want to be more sure that you are you are fine, because in life you have to deal with so many difficult events, whether it's bereavements or whether it's losing new jobs, all these sort of things that can potentially be stressful and things. You have to go through this and you have to be able to cope with them when they come and I think having been through a difficult journey candled up resilient and I think part of my reason for sharing my story, like you said, it in a positive way. You then feel very much you want to help other mothers who come into that same situation. You want to help other mothers because you know you've been there, you understand it, you don't judge and your keen for them to make a good recovery as well. That's important part of it. Yeah, now, I got completely agree. I think you know, if you can help the people in the process and raise awareness about it and help those who might be struggling with it or struggling with other things as well and they're, you know, trying to bring up raise a family, and you know the might have a quite hard position and then something like this happens. You know the it's an extra cog in the works, isn't it? It's is especially is at the moment. Mothers can't get out because of isolating with the covedness situation. They haven't they aren't too to mother and told the groups to meet other mothers and share share things. So they're often on their own and I can't imagine if I think it's been made with times to give birth of the last few months, because you can't family can't come and support, your friends aren't around and interestingly, not Adam, one of my good friends who have known for very long time. He went into hospital in London and it's usually the mother who would get post partner psychosis, but in his case he got sleep deprived and he end up having trouble and I think it's very difficult because in any other situation, Adam, I would have rushed down there and rushed the goons because I because I know what it's like and I've experienced it. But I had to keep the distance, which was so hard because it's not easy to phone somebody and to talk about it, and I found that very difficult, but I imagined his wife and the baby were on their own and I think her mom might have ended up going to help as well, but which was fortunate, because I think it's hard to having a baby at this point if your husband and goes into hospital and you're left very difficult, very difficult. I'm right now. Yeah, no, it is very difficult and I think, like you said, in Nice situation as well, it's that communication, or how can you communicate such a big, deep topic over the phone and effectively? You know, it's just on the same if your person explaining it, and you know, when your partner goes into hospital with that kind of support, that work, isn't it? Because you kind of like working together, you know, to keep things running really so it's going to be strain on the personal as well, and I think in any of the situation you'd have lots of support. Everybody wants to come down and visit you and things, but in this situation it's so difficult you can't do that. Yeah, but yeah, just me. My second project, which would be the book that I'm currently working on. Thing, the illustrations for is a story about little boy and as grandfather and the time that they spend together while his mummy is in hospital. So I'm trying to write the first book about put buttons like Usis has ever been written for children, but in a really lovely way, because they explore it through artwork and to do the beauty of psychosis through artwork that the little boy shares with his mother and I'm just the conversations he has with his grandfather, because I can't imagine how you explain the situation to a child but his mummy can't be with him, but...

...why she's in hospital and it's not just got broken leg or a broken arm or anything that they can understand. So I've tried to work out a way to explain it the children to understand, but it's just it could be passed off as just a beautiful story about time spent with his grandfather and the baking lead you together, things that actively do together and how much he enjoys going to with his mom and things when the little babies, little be the sister, has been born and the conversations they have about about life and things, though it's just a little story then the day, but it's never been done before to try and do children's book. That explain such a challenging and you should to put filing's books. But I have enjoyed that challenge very much and I'm enjoying doing the illustrations for the book which has been finished, in terms of right in the story more illustrations, because I love to put illustrations on every page, and that's what's quite unusual about my stories is they've got so many water color the statents them, because personally, that's a bit that I really enjoy, is is doing water colors. I think if I can do that for a for a career, I'll be a very happy woman. If I can enjoy pain bringing stories to life through the illustration work I do, that's that I really enjoy. I think that's I think so. I think's amazing what you're doing and I think as well it's such a great way to communicate such a topic, especially you know mental health, which when your finger mental health, and you know anxiety, depression, psychosis. It's all in text, it's all written. There were no i'ven't really seen any any books that contain illustrations and images in regards these topics, and I think like to to explain it and pictures as great and I think like in the form of like pictures, it's it's such a great way to communicate, isn't it? Through images, through pictures, through illustrations. There's so much that you can kind of take from it. Yeah, and I think as as people write books for all the children, they stop putting pictures in the chapter books. So they just have lots of words and I think it's a shame not to keep putting in the pictures for the children because I think it just adds to their imagination and creativity type pictures to look at and I think some of the at least one of the children's laureates from a few years ago, Chris Frydale, he was very much supportive of putting pictures in child books. He enjoyed the illustrations and he felt was an important thing to bring people's awareness of because I think as kids get older they just stopped putting the pictures in and it's a shame. It's just just a see of words and I think it would be lovely to continue putting the pictures in books for kids because I just think it adds value. It just it's just really loved thing. Had I don't know. They seem to stop putting them out of the well, so can the Alma will continue. Yeah, they bade it's great. Yeah, that's angry because I think as well with colors, because you know the color, if you think of like color psychology as well, and bright colors, they make you feel good and make you feel all these different emotions, like, you know, through cal are, and I think you know as a child your children are drawn to that on. I mean I've seen kids reading a box and they like looking at the pictures. It's you know, they can see the story. It's you know, and their minds as well. They're taking in what's going on around them. Yeah, I think they can enjoy the stories for longer as well, because my kids are all different ages and the youngest ones they can't read themselves the full book, but they love because it's got pictures in it. They are happy for me to read them chapters, whereas if it was just words it might be hard to keep their attention. And then, as they get older about reading the stories themselves and having pictures something helps at that stage. So yeah, I think it for a...

...longer period of time. They can enjoy books that way. Because even from a young age, that, like you said, that from a young age is still really enjoy the pictures own dis yeah, let me I feel. I feel books are very powerful things. I think that's what partly I love about the project that I'm doing Taylor jar which is going back to what we started talking about the beginning, was writing the stories for families where children have been breathed. But I'm hoping that brings comfort and healing by having a book that's all of their family memories and all of the people that important to them and things have happened, holidays they've had. Like you would a memory books, you'd keep all the things that are sentimental in it. But I feel that books for children can be very, very powerful. They help you when it comes to making decisions and not just all about skeeping enjoyment. I think they teach you a lot, but you get a lot of a lot from books in terms of it's a very powerful vessel somehow to because I think especially kids enjoy reading partly because it's time spent with a parent, that you time to bond of a book, and I think reading time together and meanings are very important part of the day, but also as they develop their own interest and choice of books and they get lost in those worlds and they start creating, and it's the imagination that comes with it. They start creating their own stories and the people they then become because they've read about these heroes and the things that they've done in the books, and it does inspire them in different parts of the life when they decide what to do. I think books are wonderful that way, and I don't think that's why I feel quite excited about the fact that Taylor John does these stories just for these families in order to sort of it's offering them a lot, hopefully to each family, but it's a hard concept to get across them things because nobody's trying to try to do that. Before you can get books are personalized by having your name or birthday or friend in it, but to actually write the entire story based on a person and to give them something special. The people are very confused when I say it's the business called tailor y'Arn, because they like so is about clothes them and like who nothing to do? Yeah, that's very confusing, because people forget that yawning story, as well as the wall that you would use to make a cap, as you say. So it's likely can tap us your someone's life using words and pictures. So I always say that I am in illustrate. I yeah, I illustrating the instead of designing the clothes, but I also stitch together words and ideas in the stories. So in that way the sinse what a tailor would do. He'd make something that would fit somebody perfectly. You wouldn't. Most closes kind of sort off the shelf. You get hundred the same size, you pit what size you want, but a tailor would spend so many hours creating one set of clothes that would fit somebody perfectly. So that's in the idea. That's what I would like to do in terms of treat a spending hundreds of hours creating a book for one family. So yeah, I mean in a tellex talk it talks about the very beginning. Is kind of sets the theme by saying can you just imagine walking to bookshop, have a child and find a book on the shelf and discovering that your book? It's all about you, your story, family story. I just love that con set. Really, I just really love comfort. Yeah, now, such a beautiful concepts and the way you put it, like you said, you know, it's almost like a cross craftsmanship, isn't it? You're an artist and you're creating this, this book, and it's very personal, you know, to you, because you're putting everything into it and you're doing the illustrations and you're putting a, you know, all the work into it. Yeah, it, you know, and and that that relationship with that person, that family as well, I goes with it. You know, it's quite as it's very, pretty close, and I...

...think that's such a positive, lovely thing to do. I I, like you said, I love, I won't go off topic too much, but I love, like you know, like suits and, you know, watches and craftsmanship that goes into something. You know, someone who is to vote to their craft, and it's almost like you know all you know, so occur piece of arts, and that's like what you're doing as well, and I think that's really, you know, really beneficial and I think you know, you're, like you said. I remember when we prove spoke, you said that use use doing like a job before this and you kind of came in entrepreneur and left that dive into this and I think, like you know, it's an amazing leap. You know, you taken a big leap into entrepreneurship. Yeah, yeah, because you have to then start doing everything that you you haven't thought about doing before. You have to deal with the whole business side of it and, to be honest with you, I didn't. The biggest challenge I've had is trying to make what I want to do as a nonprofit, because I've set up at the community interest company, so not for profit. But how does sustain the business? How don't make it sustainable that I can continue doing that for use to come? That's been the biggest in the ABEM because I wouldn't want to charge people for the books. I want to create them for donations or two fundraise, but I wouldn't want to say this is going to cost you. Have a many because you can't reput a price on it, the number of hours that go into it. And I want to do it because I want to do it and I want to so I don't want to charge it and I think that's the hardest challenge for me. Is then how does my business how to make the business sustainable, financially viable? How can I prove I can continue doing this and for me it's in an interesting to trying to look at that side of things and what can I do to support continue to be an author. I think as well, Addam, many authors don't go full time straight away. A lot of them will have another job and do the writing on the side until they published four or five books and need become wellknown and then they can decide. All we I want to do this all the time and I know exactly how I'm going to go about doing that, as I think it's not many authors go full time straight away. So, yeah, it's a different one. Yeah, no, sers that time time frame as well, isn't it? I suppose it's because a lot of times got to go into it. That's right. That's right. And so what I'm trying to do is I'm trying to illustrate more books. So I couldn't I do feel that, if I got some paid work as an illustrator, if I find some of the children's authors who wanted their books illustrating, that's part I really enjoy and I would you like to do. And then actually, from that income, I can afford you write more books for families without having to charge them. He's amount of these that I think that's hopefully good way forward. Offers and find it's they can pet as an artist. It's a lot of people looking at looking to get work out there in the illustrating book side of things. So I think it's like any job. It will take time to build up a reputation, people to see work, start recognizing it and things. So yeah, I've got a few a few different people who've come to me that I'm interested in illustrating do some illustration work for them and the part that really yeah, hoping to get a bit more of that done over the next few months and and that would really help. So yeah, yeah, that be good. So passable fly. I mean I saw your Ted talk as one. I saw the the some of the other illustrations that you shown on the on the talking really really nice. Really I think some of them it was it like a setting in a small little village. A small little village is very quaint and I was like you captured it really well. I was really nice because they're not they're not your average illustration, are they? They they don't follow a kind of standard as in had explain it there. Look unusual because I think I've gonna gone about them in a different way to most people. HMM.

I got different layer of detail in the in the paintings at different I don't know Hawd to explain, but it's not a typical cartoon animations are baby know, the the very they are very, very different in a nice way. You goes very personal to see, you know, is your own work that's gone into it. Yeah, yeah, I love detailed work. I've got tiny tip tiny paint brushes that are so miniscule to do all the pain dealties from details and paintings. Nice, lovely, because I remember you saying you touch base on on on something in your talk about a coming word for word, but use talking about the universities, you mentioned someone about the universe who's use doing something and then you had this idea about this. Yeah, so I was studying psychology and thinking, Oh, I might be a psychological psychological well being practitioner later on. That quite interesting to say. Study psychology for a year, but the university sent through a competition saying if you have a business idea, there's an entrepreneur competition to win some money to start for business, and I hadn't note. I just applied thinking I've had this idea because I've enjoyed writing books. I would like to do them for families individually, and so I went up a competition not ething to happen, but it was one of those things that kind of teaches you is always worst trying new things in life, because you never know. You got nothing to lose, you never know what can come out of it, because it changed my life entirely and it took a completely different track. Now I never I never intended to be an entrepreneur and I feel like I got into accidentally because the judges in the competition said, please, don't abandon this idea, we really want to see you make a go of it, whereas if they hadn't given me that confidence, Adam, I wouldn't have had the confidence in myself to give up everything else and start from scratch to create a business, because I wouldn't say, Oh, I do have the skills, I don't know how to see these things. I've always been employed, I've always had a job security, I've never had to give everything myself to work at all out myself. So I think I wouldn't have had the confidence if I hadn't been for the great feedback that I'd had from the competition judges and that gave me a confidence to try and see if you can make this work. So, if that's been so, I always laugh about being an accidental entrepreneurs. Never been awesome, never be entrepreneurs and kind of very surprised to find myself in the situation that I mean. But I couldn't be happier. Adam like I was. I feel like I never enjoyed the job I had before and I feel like I'm very much on the right path now in my in being creative. And what's been interesting is I've really I've recently, ever, applied to to the NHS, Nhs England, to say, you know, have lots of artists at the moment who are painting NHS portraits for free, people doing lots of artwork for the Nache, and I said, can I contribute the idea of the books to help preserve the memories of NHS frontline workers who have lost their lives in the coronavirus, and so they was on board and they put me as a national volunteer. Now, so I'm contributing towards the COVID nineteen effort in order to help the nages and they're going to send that information round to the Nags Trust. But I need people to know that it's not just any justest front my workers. I'll do these books. I would do them for any families affected by the coronavirus because I want to help as many families as possible and I think it's been terribly hard during the last few months because if anybody has suffered a bereavement, they've got funerals but they can't always attend. People are lave end and I just think you can't get together and share the memories the way that you would normally in any situation like that, and I just wondered whether the books could pull the memories together from the coworkers and the families and relatives, and that's a way to kind of preserve them MMM in the way that to share them, because they can't do it in the normal way...

...at the moment, with things being the way they are, so scial distancing. I think it's yeah, it's a hard time. Family's good to believe. Yeah, I think I think that's that's that's amazing what you're doing and I think that's a really great idea and I you know, I employ you for that and I, you know, admire that. You you just jump out, you know, you just jump into it. You're you know, you're you're just doing what you love and enjoy and what you feel strongly about, and you're you know, you're putting that into practice and you're you know, you're taking that leap of fet you into it. You know, that's that's what it's all about. It isn't easy, but you're you know, you're giving it a shot and you're doing it and yeah, you know, that's really inspiring and I think it's really motivating. What you're doing really inspiring, really positive and yeah, I wish you all the very, very first what you're doing, if you're doing amazing work. And you know, Dude, sorry, I found we talk. You talk about taking a step of faith and I think that's a very important point to nation. I think in my cadet talk I use the example of Martin Luther King Jr, who said faith is taking the first step on a staircase where you book, yeah, where you can step the whole staircase, and that's so true. You can't see where it's going to lead. You just had hope that everything you do get you one step closer somehow, and you know there's ideas of how to do that. Every day I think Sha try this today, or should I go down this route, because I found that I'd love to connect more with the event charities and in the brief sector, but I have found that I keep thinking, well, maybe if I get in touch them again today, or maybe tried hospice in this case, or a child eiment charity, and I think I sort of feel at some point down the line something's going to fall into place and people will want to connect with me and do two projects together, and it's just hoping that every step I take is any one step closer to that. HMM, naics. It's my think collaborate really important. To end the day, I think being able to work in partnership with other organizations together on projects. I think that's the way forward because it's so hard to do by self, because I didn't know any any families have been pressingly affected by the coronavirus, but there's so many are out there and yeah, yeah, no, I agree, but I think lots of all medic to help and support those families. But then they've got a lot of work on their place as well and they were working from home and in a a difficult situation to stay in. Because before lockdown I went to breathe, an advisory group, and I was allowed to share my story if what I'm doing, and I felt that's really positive. But then all of a sudden it's lockdown and haven't seen anybody from the group and it's wondering what ever else is doing. But I think everybody else has just been working from home and trying to keep things afloat and working with families they already are in bold with, trying to support them as this they can. HMM. So yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah, no, I think. I think you're doing gray and I think, like you said, collaborating is key, isn't it, and working with other people and organizations are trying to get your word across and having them support you. It all kind of like pieces together, doesn't it? And I think, like with what you're doing, it's funny our life work sometimes, you know, like what's some time? You know, you do one thing at least to another which the least another thing. And, like you said, you're doing that psychology course, you know, which led you onto this and it's like, you know, without that kind of course and that moment in your life down, if he wasn't doing that, you've fully there in this now. So it will kind of like I wouldn't be thanks, I wouldn't be here talking to you, but hadn't been the jest university faith. Yeah, choosing to do pot you was the best decision I've ever made in my life because, even though I haven't turned into psychologist, they gave me, they are offered me the Tedx talk opportunity. They offered me another competition to do, is national competition. For some time there entrepreneur entrepreneurs.

So that's what I'm doing workshops for the moment, but it was going to be that the finals were in when they stayed in down in London, but it's all going to be virtual. But they give you so many workshops to help entrepreneurs that I feel like I'm doning so much, and again it's all from university opportunity. They give me all the opportunity to help me on this journey, which had been absolutely fantastic. I think I've had the best the best opportunities, the best start for the business thanks to them recognizing I'm trying to do and really falling in love with the idea and being really supportive, really, yeah, with it most definitely. Yeah, and that's all from deciding to do psychology. Yeah, yeah, some. Yeah, it's amazing and I think you know you're doing great and I think you know this is just getting really saw me and just watch the space. Yeah, definitely. But where can? Where can people find you? On like social media and or website? So on social media, they look up Taylor Jahn. They'll find me on twitter and Instagram, and then on facebook. I've always got a facebook page page called Taylor do on. But then on on Linkedin, I'm Jillian seal and and I'd say actually, I'm surprised at them, but that's tender to be my favorite platform. Yeah, I because I thought, as an illustrate, to be more instagram. I think I need to work more instagram side in terms of engaging with people. I Love the Art Pagram. It'stantastic. I love it platform, but I think Linkedin I've made more connections with people and just buy lots of other entrepreneurs out looking to help one another and I feel it's a great supportive network there. So yeah, I'm on Linkedin as well. But yeah, I think that's I've got a tailor Jn website, tailor Jarncom, and you can see my artwork and there see the projects I'm working on. I think. Yeah, so, yeah, that be that's really great. And social media is probably one of the most time consuming things I've every yeah, I think. Yeah, that's that's the one thing that I found. You spend so much time doing that and I'd love to get this the point where I'm spending more time writing in the illustrating let's time on the business. But you've got to build engage with your audience and yeah, just having conversations with people. Again, you never know where conversations going to lead. So I might find something on twitter that've fend interesting about a book festival or something helping mental health, school stories, all that sort of thing, and you just never know where there's conversations a thing get it to lead further down the line. So it's always really interesting. Yeah, no, I don't coughing you of thing is gray with you doing, and I completely a great I think, like you know, it's almost like the momentum just builds, doesn't it? You know, like you're doing the social media, you're doing those different things and yeah, yeah, it takes time, but you know, I think, like you know, what you're doing pays off and you know, it's the input, the positive impact that you're having on others through what you're doing, isn't it? Yeah, you know that's just going to continue to you know, kind of spread, you know, and help people. Yeah, I feel like I've sort of had conversations with other people have done tedex talks on Linkedin and I've always said, can I listen to your tedextalk first, and I just because I get so much from listening to them. I think that's a great platform and or in terms of sharing ideas that are trying to inspire the people, and I think, yeah, I really enjoyed being part of that. And again, something I would have never expected. These duds and probably most terrifying thing I've ever done, if I'm honest that, then it was absolutely terrifying to stand up and talk. But again, because I believe what I'm doing, it was it was worth going through this, being nervous rick with it. But but then part of the whole experience with listen to the other talks. You's up to other people shame their ideas, which I found really great. I...

...really enjoyed that. Yeah, so nice. Exactly. That's, you know, pushing out your comfort zone and just getting out there. And Yeah, and you you know, you do that thing, you can do the next thing. You just kind of do this resilience. I think you know it's amazing. Yeah, yeah, but I'm not feel like you's something I did. You would do. So definitely did. Yeah, exactly, and I'll put that. I'll put that youtube link in the description as well as over people can see it. Very, very welcome, but but not jually. It's been a pleasure talking to you in really good, such base again and I think you know what you're doing is, you know, really positive, really amazing, and just keep it up and I'll promote it on my side of things as well. For it. Yeah, let me know and let me know when it goes out. And Yeah, I think you too. You Welcome, but but not have a great day and keep keep doing we doing. I will. Thank you so much. How did were you two? Take Care, take care. I don't.

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